Brexit and the Consequences

Atilla

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Nov 15, 2006
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#46
Brexit’s Biggest Fans Face New 115 Billion-Pound Pension Hole

Nice move that saving £350m a week.

Be interesting to see and hear how Brexiters work this one out. It's not about the money, I know but wait till they start freezing to death in the middle of winter, saving pennies on fuel prices which will have risen due to fall in pound along with dwindling NHS resources and then come back and say it's not about the money.

Not good at all. :(
 

Atilla

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Nov 15, 2006
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#48
Yeah, but looking on the bright side, if it means we can buy funny shaped bananas and cucumbers that don't comply with EU regulation length and girth - it'll be worth it.
(y)
Can't imagine you with a funny shaped banana Tim, but what ever floats your boat :LOL:
 

Splitlink

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Nov 18, 2001
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#49
Yeah, but looking on the bright side, if it means we can buy funny shaped bananas and cucumbers that don't comply with EU regulation length and girth - it'll be worth it.
(y)
The strange thing about that, Tim, is that I was in the fruit shop, in Barcelona, the other day and the Fyffes bananas were straighter, bigger and cheaper than all the others in the shop. Are you sure that this is not an old wives' tale?.
 

timsk

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Mar 18, 2002
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#50
The strange thing about that, Tim, is that I was in the fruit shop, in Barcelona, the other day and the Fyffes bananas were straighter, bigger and cheaper than all the others in the shop. Are you sure that this is not an old wives' tale?.
Yeah, it probably is Split'. That said, the underlying point about not having to do what some unelected bureaucrat in Brussels dictates - still stands.

The Bloomberg article makes for alarming reading - if one chooses to believe it. My view is that it falls firmly into the third category of Disraeli's assessment about lies: "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." I no more accept it's conclusions than I would if someone were to make out that we'll all be better off by the same amount as a result of Brexit. Finances fluctuate, but principles don't change quite so readily and, IMO, are worth hanging on to. On that basis, I believe it's better to be free at the risk of being poorer, potentially at least, than it is to be forever imprisoned in the gilded EU cage.
Tim.
 

Atilla

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Nov 15, 2006
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#51
Yeah, it probably is Split'. That said, the underlying point about not having to do what some unelected bureaucrat in Brussels dictates - still stands.

The Bloomberg article makes for alarming reading - if one chooses to believe it. My view is that it falls firmly into the third category of Disraeli's assessment about lies: "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." I no more accept it's conclusions than I would if someone were to make out that we'll all be better off by the same amount as a result of Brexit. Finances fluctuate, but principles don't change quite so readily and, IMO, are worth hanging on to. On that basis, I believe it's better to be free at the risk of being poorer, potentially at least, than it is to be forever imprisoned in the gilded EU cage.
Tim.
Damn lies indeed.

EU is a voluntary organisation. UK can leave if it wants to.

Becoming a member is more difficult than leaving!

A Member of the European Parliament (MEP) is a person who has been elected to serve as a popular representative in the European Parliament.[1]

When the European Parliament was first established, MEPs were directly appointed by the governments of member states from among those already sitting in their own national parliaments. Since 1979, however, MEPs have been elected by direct universal suffrage. Each member state establishes its own method for electing MEPs – and in some states this has changed over time – but the system chosen must be a form of proportional representation. In some member states the MEPs are elected to represent a single national constituency; in others they are elected from sub-national regions.



Each Commissioner is first nominated by their member state in consultation with the Commission President, although the President holds little practical power to force a change in candidate. The more capable the candidate is, the more likely the Commission President will assign them a powerful portfolio, the distribution of which is entirely at his discretion. The President's team is then subject to hearings at the European Parliament which will question them and then vote on their suitability as a whole. If members of the team are found to be inappropriate, the President must then reshuffle the team or request a new candidate from the member state or risk the whole Commission being voted down. As Parliament cannot vote against individual Commissioners there is usually a compromise whereby the worst candidates are removed but minor objections are put aside so the Commission can take office. Once the team is approved by parliament, it is formally put into office by the European Council (TEU Article 17:7).

In the last 40 years - just to repeat - 94% of all decisions have been voted for and agreed by UK.

This is likely to be one of the biggest chunk of works that will need to be re-incorporated back into English parliament.
 

Splitlink

Well-known member
Nov 18, 2001
10,850
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#52
Yeah, it probably is Split'. That said, the underlying point about not having to do what some unelected bureaucrat in Brussels dictates - still stands.

The Bloomberg article makes for alarming reading - if one chooses to believe it. My view is that it falls firmly into the third category of Disraeli's assessment about lies: "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." I no more accept it's conclusions than I would if someone were to make out that we'll all be better off by the same amount as a result of Brexit. Finances fluctuate, but principles don't change quite so readily and, IMO, are worth hanging on to. On that basis, I believe it's better to be free at the risk of being poorer, potentially at least, than it is to be forever imprisoned in the gilded EU cage.
Tim.
From your side of the fence, it is, probably, true. Home is where you hang your hat, though, and we all have different ideas. I don't think that I live in a gilded cage. Perhaps, like the monkey, I look through the bars and think the ones looking in are the ones in the cage!
 
Likes: Atilla
Aug 21, 2004
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#53
I don't understand you Remainians :)

What part of "the EU will fall apart" do you not understand ?
Not like it's a secret or anything. The whole world knows it's a big bag of sh*$e :LOL:
 
Aug 21, 2004
9,062
2,277
323
Manchester
#54
Damn lies indeed.

EU is a voluntary organisation. UK can leave if it wants to.

Becoming a member is more difficult than leaving!

A Member of the European Parliament (MEP) is a person who has been elected to serve as a popular representative in the European Parliament.[1]

When the European Parliament was first established, MEPs were directly appointed by the governments of member states from among those already sitting in their own national parliaments. Since 1979, however, MEPs have been elected by direct universal suffrage. Each member state establishes its own method for electing MEPs – and in some states this has changed over time – but the system chosen must be a form of proportional representation. In some member states the MEPs are elected to represent a single national constituency; in others they are elected from sub-national regions.



Each Commissioner is first nominated by their member state in consultation with the Commission President, although the President holds little practical power to force a change in candidate. The more capable the candidate is, the more likely the Commission President will assign them a powerful portfolio, the distribution of which is entirely at his discretion. The President's team is then subject to hearings at the European Parliament which will question them and then vote on their suitability as a whole. If members of the team are found to be inappropriate, the President must then reshuffle the team or request a new candidate from the member state or risk the whole Commission being voted down. As Parliament cannot vote against individual Commissioners there is usually a compromise whereby the worst candidates are removed but minor objections are put aside so the Commission can take office. Once the team is approved by parliament, it is formally put into office by the European Council (TEU Article 17:7).

In the last 40 years - just to repeat - 94% of all decisions have been voted for and agreed by UK.

This is likely to be one of the biggest chunk of works that will need to be re-incorporated back into English parliament.
Phew, well that's a relief. :LOL:
 

Atilla

Well-known member
Nov 15, 2006
18,269
2,528
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#55
I don't understand you Remainians :)

What part of "the EU will fall apart" do you not understand ?
Not like it's a secret or anything. The whole world knows it's a big bag of sh*$e :LOL:
Oh yeah sorry Sparky, forgot you knew how things will turn out before everyone else.

Thanks for the heads up :LOL:


Great plan by the way. Can't wait to see what other surprises you have for us. ;)
 

timsk

Well-known member
Mar 18, 2002
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#57
. . . Perhaps, like the monkey, I look through the bars and think the ones looking in are the ones in the cage!
You might very well think that Split' - and I think I know why. . .

As someone who's been going to Andalucía (yes, I know it's a long way from Barca, lol!) at least once a year for the last twenty and have lived there for two winters, I have been spellbound by the gargantuan sums of money that's been spent on massive infrastructure projects in the region, e.g. the high speed rail link from Malaga to Seville. While the debate about HS2 rumbles on and on here in the U.K. - in Spain they just get on and build it. Don't get me wrong, it's great - love it, but we all know where the money comes from that pays for it. All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. And within the EU, it is the latter who pay for the former.
Tim.

PS. Cue Atilla to do a cut 'n paste job outlining how much more the U.K. gets out of the EU than it pays in!
:p
 

Atilla

Well-known member
Nov 15, 2006
18,269
2,528
323
#58
You might very well think that Split' - and I think I know why. . .

As someone who's been going to Andalucía (yes, I know it's a long way from Barca, lol!) at least once a year for the last twenty and have lived there for two winters, I have been spellbound by the gargantuan sums of money that's been spent on massive infrastructure projects in the region, e.g. the high speed rail link from Malaga to Seville. While the debate about HS2 rumbles on and on here in the U.K. - in Spain they just get on and build it. Don't get me wrong, it's great - love it, but we all know where the money comes from that pays for it. All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. And within the EU, it is the latter who pay for the former.
Tim.

PS. Cue Atilla to do a cut 'n paste job outlining how much more the U.K. gets out of the EU than it pays in!
:p

Well I can tell you dear Timsk, the UK pays more for the EU than it gets out.

We pay £350m a week and pay extra-ordinary billions as and when needed, as we did to bail out the Irish.

We gave up our fishing industry.

We buy all their cars and luxery items, not to mention food stuff like pizzas and wines.

We don't really sell them anything much as we prefer to sell to the rest of the World. At least we could do if the pesky Europeans didn't stop us from selling to the rest of the World.

They come over here and benefit from our NHS and favourable benefit system and they do absolute FA.

We teach them how to farm more efficiently and then they go back home and do it all for them selves.

They take our best brains for their space and defence R&D. They use our universities to reap better understanding of how the world works and then they naff off.

They can have Ireland and Scotland and Wales too. Be good to get rid of the lot of'm.


No links required mate it's all up in the head. So true dat is. God bless you if there was one for voting exit. Thanks to you many milliions of baby boomers retiring about now will get a decent pension and no longer queue waiting for hospital appointments.

Great call (y)