Brexit and the Consequences

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Atilla

Well-known member
Nov 15, 2006
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Obviously there will be overlap across all generations.

But in general, older more life experienced people will vote according to that accumulated experience and wisdom. The Ones who learned from their own and others mistakes.
imo EU has been around since 1950s and working fine.

As with all things, issues need to be maintained, changed, improved, decommed and so forth.

So what have you learnt in the last 70 years?


Do you not see the contradiction in your words?
 

Atilla

Well-known member
Nov 15, 2006
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Watched a bit of these two videos but the commentator was such a buffoon, couldn't watch it any further.

Yes we know there are differences between the member states. Hence, the reason for the free movement of capital and labour. System will reach harmony and level out if one adheres to market forces.

Can't believe those people passing themselves as experts. If one takes their approach, we should as has been said before separate the counties and let each become self financing with a balanced budget and see how that works out. A little like an independent county of London and let the rest of the UK defend for it self.

If one side works hard and the other sits idle, falsifies accounts and participates in freud and evading paying taxes what does one expect.

Each to their own.



To something a little more interesting came across this... thought I'd share with you.

These are the new Dark Ages.

Centuries ago, Europe was in the depths of its own misery—the population huddled, starving, mired in sin and hopelessness. They were as a congested forest, suffocated by deadwood, awaiting God’s lightning strike—the spark that would finally ignite the fire that would rage across the land and clear the deadwood, once again bringing sunshine to the healthy roots.

Culling is God’s Natural Order.

Ask yourself, What followed the Black Death?

We all know the answer.

The Renaissance.

Rebirth.

It has always been this way. Death is followed by birth.

To reach Paradise, man must pass through Inferno.

This, the master taught us.

And yet the silver-haired ignorant dares call me monster? Does she still not grasp the mathematics of the future? The horrors it will bring?

I am the Shade.

I am your salvation.

And so I stand, deep within this cavern, gazing out across the lagoon that reflects no stars. Here in this sunken palace, Inferno smolders beneath the waters.

Soon it will burst into flames.

And when it does, nothing on earth will be able to stop it.




Reading Dan Brown's Inferno again. This piece of text really resonated with me. That's Dante's Inferno by the way. Gripping stuff. He was a bit of a sad nutter too imo. Europe is still here and I wonder where he is now? :devilish:
 

Atilla

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Nov 15, 2006
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http://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...e-from-u-k-funds-on-brexit-than-during-crisis

Individual investors pulled more from U.K. investment funds in the month that Britain voted to leave the European Union than they did during any equivalent period in the global financial crisis.

Retail investors redeemed a net 3.5 billion pounds ($4.7 billion) from funds in June, according to data compiled by The Investment Association. Equities accounted for most of the outflows, with 2.8 billion pounds pulled, while property funds were hit with 1.4 billion pounds of redemptions, the data shows.

“The scale of the exodus from investment funds in June is quite extraordinary, with the Brexit vote eclipsing the financial crisis,” said Laith Khalaf, a senior analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown. “Clearly investors were rattled by the referendum, and switched out of assets they perceived to be at risk from a vote to leave the EU.”
 

Atilla

Well-known member
Nov 15, 2006
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July not looking good.

United Kingdom Manufacturing PMI 2008-2016 | Data | Chart | Calendar
The seasonally adjusted Markit/CIPS PMI in the United Kingdom fell to 48.2 in July 2016 from 52.4 in June and below the earlier flash estimate of 49.1. It was the lowest reading since February 2013, driven by a contraction in both levels of production and incoming new orders, as the impact of increased business uncertainty on the domestic market after the EU referendum offset an increase in new export business supported by a weaker pound.



http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-kingdom/manufacturing-pmi
 

Mr. Charts

Well-known member
Sep 18, 2001
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I think Mark Carney and the MPC have made their evidence based decisions on the effects of Brexit abundantly clear.
This referendum was a heart (+ protest) versus logic decision or to put it another way, hope v. known reality.
Opinions don't matter as much as facts and they speak for themselves.
 
Aug 21, 2004
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Good move from BOE. Sterling had started creeping back up. Obviously Carney spotted this and knocked it on the head, for the sake of our export lead boom. :LOL:

I guess Govt is still formulating policy and we are not likely to hear what that is until the autumn statement.
 

Mr. Charts

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Sep 18, 2001
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1. £11.49 billion net to the EU (and I'm a remainer !)
and
2. £12.2 billion in foreign aid (and I believe in helping people who really need it world wide )
per year....
£455 million total every single week of the year

1. The net outgoings to the EU seem a lot more than they should (have been) and a lot is wasted
and
2. The foreign aid is not targeted well enough on desperate people we should be helping and a lot is wasted on dubious schemes.
 

Atilla

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Nov 15, 2006
18,082
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Can someone tell me when we are going to stop importing and start exporting our inflation instead?

Call me selfish if you must but when can I expect some decent return on my savings?


Thanks!

(y)
 

Signalcalc

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May 21, 2016
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Can someone tell me when we are going to stop importing and start exporting our inflation instead?



Call me selfish if you must but when can I expect some decent return on my savings?





Thanks!



(y)


Looks like we are going the same way as Japan, prepare for decades of Carneynomics.

Nothing to do with Brexit, Brexit has just made it more acute and just speeded up the inevitable.
 
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Atilla

Well-known member
Nov 15, 2006
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The labour market entered "freefall" after the vote to leave the EU, with the number of permanent jobs placed by recruitment firms last month falling at the fastest pace since May 2009, according to the Recruitment and Employment Confederation.


"The Treasury pay attention to this survey - (it) has a good record of predicting the labour market. They will be worried," Rupert Harrison, chief macro strategist for multi-asset at BlackRock who was chief of staff to ex-finance minister George Osborne, said on Twitter.

Most economists agreed on Thursday that the Bank of England's stimulus will need to be bolstered by reforms and significant investment from the government to truly counter the downturn resulting from the vote to leave the EU.

Prime Minister Theresa May's new government is due to release announce its fiscal plans in a few months, but the big questions about Britain's future as a trading power will not be resolved for a long time - a cause of worry for foreign investors like Nissan.
 

Splitlink

Well-known member
Nov 18, 2001
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Can someone tell me when we are going to stop importing and start exporting our inflation instead?

Call me selfish if you must but when can I expect some decent return on my savings?


Thanks!

(y)
I don't think that anywhere has high interest rates just now. We have that problem in Spain.

People are buying into shares for that reason but, wait! That entails risk. Company dividends will, eventually, affect prices. Then what?