Brexit and the Consequences

tomorton

Legendary member
7,719 1,097
The burning question: will Att be spending the new 50p or will he be following the lead of the anti-Brexit hero Lord Adonis and throwing them away (I'm guessing Lord Adonis is a millionaire and can therefore afford to throw cash away)?
I remember a colleague telling me she had sat next to Lord Adonis at some presentation event. She seriously said he wasn't anything like as good looking as she had expected............
 

tomorton

Legendary member
7,719 1,097
After we leave the EU, most economists think the economy's growth will slow down a bit for a few years, maybe even get a little smaller. After that they don't know. Almost no economists think Brexit will cause a UK recession. So nobody gets rich, nobody goes broke.

But the UK gets a lot more rights. We can do exactly what we would have done if still in the EU but if we do, it will be by democratic process in London, not by EU Directive from Brussels. And the UK will not be subsumed slice by slice into the US of E. Hard to put a price on that.
 
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MasterOfCoin

Well-known member
283 98
Well, have been watching the FTSE nosedive since the 17th.

(and dropping sharply today)

But that's more to do with a little Chinky virus getting out of hand than Brexit.

;)
 

Atilla

Legendary member
19,236 2,756
Yes let's party now and we can pick up the tabs later. LOL

Blair the most successful Laobur PM was also a big hit with uncle Bushy and the Iraq war. Look where he is now? Farage I think will follow same path. Become a figure of loathing who'll be told to shut-up.

Nothing has been delivered. Only that a decision has been made. Yes, we're leaving.

Negotiations with the EU and making deals with the rest of the World beckons us. Oh what joy!

Like Trump, we 'gonna' be making the best most beautiful and wonderful deals the World has ever seen.

Like Trump who's only braking deals only to make sort of smaller or no deals at all, UK has just broken one of the biggest and most successful deal the globe has ever seen, with the promise that she will make much better deals elsewhere. I suspect those new deals with the likes of NZ and the Auzzies will be considerably smaller but hailed as a Magnificient achievement. :ROFLMAO:

Two headed beast. I have a sneaky feeling the UK and US will make a deal out of desperation because they are losing to the rest of the World. Two peas in a pod.


Forget all that for now, let's just party on. (y) Well done! Let's see a jolly good show... (y)
 

Atilla

Legendary member
19,236 2,756
Very strange evening. Surreal!

Watched V for Vandetta on Sony Movies and Big Ben gongs went off quite a few time almost to celebrate Brexit.

The ending was bizarre in a reverse kind of way. Did the people win or did Parliament win? Aren't they suppose to be one and the same?

Didn't enjoy the movie as much as I did the first time.



Feeling sad. No idea why? :unsure:
 

tomorton

Legendary member
7,719 1,097
Very strange evening. Surreal!

Watched V for Vandetta on Sony Movies and Big Ben gongs went off quite a few time almost to celebrate Brexit.

The ending was bizarre in a reverse kind of way. Did the people win or did Parliament win? Aren't they suppose to be one and the same?

Didn't enjoy the movie as much as I did the first time.



Feeling sad. No idea why? :unsure:

Brexit threw into relief the divergence between voters and MP's.

MP's are representatives, not delegates. they are chosen by voters in constituencies but they are not bound to consult the constituency voters in order to determine which way they should vote in Parliament on any given question. This is both a strength of our form of democracy, but also a weakness as shown by the simple statistic that though 70% of constituency-adjusted votes in the referendum were for Leave, 70% of the MP's in the country wished to Remain.

In practice I wish that the Remain MP's had been excluded from any vote on any withdrawal Bill in Parliament. It would have been unconstitutional but it could have saved us 3 years of dither and international embarassment and loss of business.
 

MasterOfCoin

Well-known member
283 98
It's true- in the UK, you vote for a person to be an MP to represent that constituency.
That person can then do whatsoever suits themselves as 'representation' until the next election.
They are not bound to any promises made, or to represent any particular views or any party.
You may have thought you could vote for a right or left wing party, or leave or remain but your MP can can do as they please once elected, including defecting to the Monster Raving Loony Hippey Yoga Party or casting votes in parliament that clearly do not reflect the views of the public that elected them. That's what we call democracy.

As to the 3 years of dither and delay, well, that's not over either, there's at least another year of being bound to the EU and all it's regulations to go yet, if not far, far longer.

To shorten the agony of the now inevitable, they might consider actually getting on with it. Ergo.

Cancel HS2 and use the money to restore Hadrians |Wall so that Scotland can have it's Inde-Ref ASAP.

Re-instate the Irish Border immediately, we're not in the bloody Schengen-Zone.

And for what rational reason are authorities 'rescuing' migrants out of the channel ? Sure, if they make it to dry land, by all means round them up and throw them in one of the concentration camps provided therefor. But if you're going to pick them up the moment they paddle into the North Sea, then just lay on some ferries and be done with it. The whole point of having a large stretch of water as a border is that it is difficult to cross. Countries don't have river and sea borders by accident.

Not suggesting that any of the above is morally righteous or even what people voted for, but it would bring a swift end to all the dithering, the years of wrangling, the floods of migrants and the end result of Brexit in name only with all of the drawbacks, rules and regulations still imposed but none of the benefits or any say in drafting them.

;)
 

tomorton

Legendary member
7,719 1,097
I don't expect the UK government will ask for an extension of the 31/12 deadline for the end of the transition period. But I think many subjects of mutual interest between the UK and the EU will be subject to individual transition arrangements for years afterwards. Most of this won't be felt by the public . Probably the two governments will urgently press on with agreements covering critical trade areas like pharmaceuticals, plus the stuff that would really aggravate voters if it went wrong - travel to/from the EU etc.

But we won't be fully out for at least 5 years.
 
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