The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

TheCycleCode

Junior member
24 0
The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

The 1.793% cycle of price has an extreme resonance with the tops and bottoms of the S&P 500 on the hourly chart when constructed as oscillating vectors in counts of five and nine. The 1.793% price cycle has consistently called, or has been extremely close to (within 94% of), 22 of the last 30 major price tops and bottoms in 16 cycles over the last three years (2010-2012).

The construction of these price cycles is straightforward and mathematical: every time price changes trend and moves 1.793% of price or more, a vector is created. When vectors are drawn and followed, a 5/9 pattern emerges. Vectors will construct an oscillating trend in one major direction even while zigzagging with smaller vectors moving against the vector’s major directional trend, until that trend consistently ends on the 5th or 9th vector in the S&P 500 on the hourly chart.
9x9.png

-S&P 500 from August 4th through November 5th, 2010 – hourly chart.

When a sufficient number of vectors are drawn, a 5/9 pattern emerges in the S&P 500 on the hourly chart. These vectors trend in a vector count of either 5 or 9 before reversing trend and establishing a new vector count of either 5 or 9 in the opposite direction (or a sideways direction in a strong trending market).

The pattern never ends. The 1.793% price cycle of the S&P 500 on the hourly chart has reversed trend after 5 or 9 vector counts since 1983, the first year I can obtain hourly S&P 500 to back test with historical data.

After following this pattern on the S&P 500 on the hourly chart with decades of hourly data, I can report that this 1.793% price cycle is astonishingly consistent and hugely profitable, especially when traded with spider (SPY) options.
BirdsEyeMedium.png

-2010-2012 S&P 500 hourly chart with 1.793% cycle vectors.

Every consecutive pair of vectors (making a minor top and a minor bottom) within a vector trend may not best the previous vector pair’s price. For example, the extreme price peak of an entire vector trend may not always be on the last 5th or 9th vector of that trend, but most often it is on the 5th or 9th vector, or very close to the price extreme for that vector trend. The 5/9 vector pattern on of the 1.793% price cycle on the S&P 500 hourly chart is beyond statistically significant, it’s unmistakable.

For example, over the course of 15 consecutive cycles between 2010 through 2012, the top and bottom price extreme has been made on the 5th or 9th vector 14 of all 30 major tops and bottoms. Another 8 cycle tops and bottoms, although not the exact top, where within 94% of the cycle extreme top and bottom. And even some of the remaining cycles with eccentric vector trends that were not at or very near the top would have still been exorbitantly profitable trades. Many of these vector trends are high single or low double digit percentage gains in the S&P 500. That would translate into several hundred percent returns in the spider (SPY) options market.

For instance, the last vector trend of 2012 which began November 16 was in excess of 10% in the S&P 500. The March 2012 SPY 148 call was bought for .94¢ when the first vector of the major trend was formed at market open on November 19, 2012. That option reached a high of $5.64 at the close of February 19, 2013.

However, the S&P 500 cycle trend was forecast to reach $1,5008.59 by the close of market on February 7, 2013. The forecasted price was actually reached on January 29th at 3:32 pm, whereupon the SPY 148 call was exited at $4.23. While the S&P 500 would have returned 10.3% on this cycle trend trade, the SPY option returned a staggering 450% return.
March13Options.png

-Spider (SPY) 148 call option prices at entry (11/19/12) and exit (1/29/13)

This last cycle trend trade was not by any means the largest tradable cycle trend of the 2010-2012 back test. Many other cycle trends exceeded 10% on the S&P 500, and many more were mid-single digit S&P 500 returns, still translating to three figure spider option returns.

In my webinar, I analyze 16 consecutive cycles from 2010-2012 in detail, and how I forecast and trade spider options (SPY) based on the 1.793% cycle on the S&P 500 hourly chart.
 
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ajv

Newbie
8 0
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

The 1.793% cycle of price has an extreme resonance with the tops and bottoms of the S&P 500 on the hourly chart when constructed as oscillating vectors in counts of five and nine. The 1.793% price cycle has consistently called, or has been extremely close to (within 94% of), 22 of the last 30 major price tops and bottoms in 16 cycles over the last three years (2010-2012).

The construction of these price cycles is straightforward and mathematical: every time price changes trend and moves 1.793% of price or more, a vector is created. When vectors are drawn and followed, a 5/9 pattern emerges. Vectors will construct an oscillating trend in one major direction even while zigzagging with smaller vectors moving against the vector’s major directional trend, until that trend consistently ends on the 5th or 9th vector in the S&P 500 on the hourly chart.
9x9.png

-S&P 500 from August 4th through November 5th, 2010 – hourly chart.

When a sufficient number of vectors are drawn, a 5/9 pattern emerges in the S&P 500 on the hourly chart. These vectors trend in a vector count of either 5 or 9 before reversing trend and establishing a new vector count of either 5 or 9 in the opposite direction (or a sideways direction in a strong trending market).

The pattern never ends. The 1.793% price cycle of the S&P 500 on the hourly chart has reversed trend after 5 or 9 vector counts since 1983, the first year I can obtain hourly S&P 500 to back test with historical data.

After following this pattern on the S&P 500 on the hourly chart with decades of hourly data, I can report that this 1.793% price cycle is astonishingly consistent and hugely profitable, especially when traded with spider (SPY) options.
BirdsEyeMedium.png

-2010-2012 S&P 500 hourly chart with 1.793% cycle vectors.

Every consecutive pair of vectors (making a minor top and a minor bottom) within a vector trend may not best the previous vector pair’s price. For example, the extreme price peak of an entire vector trend may not always be on the last 5th or 9th vector of that trend, but most often it is on the 5th or 9th vector, or very close to the price extreme for that vector trend. The 5/9 vector pattern on of the 1.793% price cycle on the S&P 500 hourly chart is beyond statistically significant, it’s unmistakable.

For example, over the course of 15 consecutive cycles between 2010 through 2012, the top and bottom price extreme has been made on the 5th or 9th vector 14 of all 30 major tops and bottoms. Another 8 cycle tops and bottoms, although not the exact top, where within 94% of the cycle extreme top and bottom. And even some of the remaining cycles with eccentric vector trends that were not at or very near the top would have still been exorbitantly profitable trades. Many of these vector trends are high single or low double digit percentage gains in the S&P 500. That would translate into several hundred percent returns in the spider (SPY) options market.

For instance, the last vector trend of 2012 which began November 16 was in excess of 10% in the S&P 500. The March 2012 SPY 148 call was bought for .94¢ when the first vector of the major trend was formed at market open on November 19, 2012. That option reached a high of $5.64 at the close of February 19, 2013.

However, the S&P 500 cycle trend was forecast to reach $1,5008.59 by the close of market on February 7, 2013. The forecasted price was actually reached on January 29th at 3:32 pm, whereupon the SPY 148 call was exited at $4.23. While the S&P 500 would have returned 10.3% on this cycle trend trade, the SPY option returned a staggering 450% return.
March13Options.png

-Spider (SPY) 148 call option prices at entry (11/19/12) and exit (1/29/13)

This last cycle trend trade was not by any means the largest tradable cycle trend of the 2010-2012 back test. Many other cycle trends exceeded 10% on the S&P 500, and many more were mid-single digit S&P 500 returns, still translating to three figure spider option returns.

In my webinar, I analyze 16 consecutive cycles from 2010-2012 in detail, and how I forecast and trade spider options (SPY) based on the 1.793% cycle on the S&P 500 hourly chart.




Hi,

Do you have an indicator for Metatrader4 for your cyclical algorithm.

Rgds
ajv
 

TheCycleCode

Junior member
24 0
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

I'm sorry that we do not at this time have a Metatrader4 indicator. I'll look into the viability of developing one.

Ciao 4 now,
Michael.
 

Shakone

Senior member
2,458 665
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

The 1.793% price cycle has consistently called, or has been extremely close to (within 94% of), 22 of the last 30 major price tops and bottoms in 16 cycles over the last three years

What does the above actually mean? How can you be within 94% of a top. So if the top was at 100, does this mean it called the top + or - 94?
 

TheCycleCode

Junior member
24 0
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

What does the above actually mean? How can you be within 94% of a top. So if the top was at 100, does this mean it called the top + or - 94?

Swing tops or bottoms precisely defined by The Cycle Code vector trends. Take the 9x9 vector cycle illustrated. Each wave is formed by vectors. The bottom of the 5th and 7th vector in the short trend are both very close to the last 9th vector. Given the length of the entire short vector trend in red, you can measure how close those wave bottoms are to the bottom of the 9th vector of the fifth short wave.

Cordially,
Michael.
 

Lord Flasheart

Legendary member
9,794 975
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

How about some live calls if its so accurate
 

Shakone

Senior member
2,458 665
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

Swing tops or bottoms precisely defined by The Cycle Code vector trends. Take the 9x9 vector cycle illustrated. Each wave is formed by vectors. The bottom of the 5th and 7th vector in the short trend are both very close to the last 9th vector. Given the length of the entire short vector trend in red, you can measure how close those wave bottoms are to the bottom of the 9th vector of the fifth short wave.

Cordially,
Michael.

Not an answer. Give me the numbers. What does it mean to be within 94% of a top?

If the top was 100, does that mean you predicted the top in the range (6, 194)? If it doesn't, what does it mean. With numbers and keep it simple please.
 

TheCycleCode

Junior member
24 0
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

How about some live calls if its so accurate

Cute video.

We provided the the upcoming forecast for the 1.793% cycle here:


The 10%+ move that just formed long in the S&P these last few months was forecasted by our mathematical and verifiable forecast model.

Cordially,
Michael.
 
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TheCycleCode

Junior member
24 0
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

Not an answer. Give me the numbers. What does it mean to be within 94% of a top?

If the top was 100, does that mean you predicted the top in the range (6, 194)? If it doesn't, what does it mean. With numbers and keep it simple please.

Cycle code vectors (in the S&P 500 on the hourly fractal) are defined by 1.793% pullbacks in price . Tops and bottoms form on the 3rd or 5th wave (5 or 9 vectors, respectively). If some other wave, let's say the first wave, makes the actual high of that vector trend, and the last wave, let's say the 5th wave, makes a high that is close, but falls short of the first wave, the 5th wave is not the high, but you can quite firmly calculate how close it came to highest wave.
 
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DionysusToast

Legendary member
5,963 1,501
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

How about some live calls if its so accurate

There is no need for live calls.

There is no need to perpetuate this discussion any further.
 
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TheCycleCode

Junior member
24 0
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

Cute video.

We provided the the upcoming forecast for the 1.793% cycle here:


The 10%+ move that just formed long in the S&P these last few months was forecasted by our mathematical and verifiable forecast model.

Cordially,
Michael.

Well, the link was taken down, I offer a one hour free webinar on our website, where we go through 16 consecutive cycles. You can find a link to that on my profile page.
 

Shakone

Senior member
2,458 665
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

Cycle code vectors (in the S&P 500 on the hourly fractal) are defined by 1.793% pullbacks in price . Tops and bottoms form on the 3rd or 5th wave (5 or 9 vectors, respectively). If some other wave, let's say the first wave, makes the actual high of that vector trend, and the last wave, let's say the 5th wave, makes a high that is close, but falls short of the first wave, the 5th wave is not the high, but you can quite firmly calculate how close it came to highest wave.

Still not an answer. You calculated 94% somehow. The number came from somewhere. Give me the numbers that led to that calculation. Thanks.
 

TheCycleCode

Junior member
24 0
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

Still not an answer. You calculated 94% somehow. The number came from somewhere. Give me the numbers that led to that calculation. Thanks.

For every cycle trend from 2010-2012 (there are 16) that did not end on a 5th or 9th vector:

Long calculations: take the 5th or 9th vector top, subtract it from the actual top (made by another wave) and divide that by the length of the vector trend.
Short calculations: take the 5th or 9th vector bottom, subtract it from the actual bottom, and divide that by the length of the vector trend.

That will give you a percentage of how close the 5th or 9th vector came to the actual top, when it did not make the top itself.

Cordially,
Michael.
 
M

member275544

0 0
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

For every cycle trend from 2010-2012 (there are 16) that did not end on a 5th or 9th vector:

Long calculations: take the 5th or 9th vector top, subtract it from the actual top (made by another wave) and divide that by the length of the vector trend.
Short calculations: take the 5th or 9th vector bottom, subtract it from the actual bottom, and divide that by the length of the vector trend.

That will give you a percentage of how close the 5th or 9th vector came to the actual top, when it did not make the top itself.

Cordially,
Michael.

complete bollox
 

Shakone

Senior member
2,458 665
Re: The Stunning Price Cycle Calling The S&P 500 Tops & Bottoms On The Hourly Chart

For every cycle trend from 2010-2012 (there are 16) that did not end on a 5th or 9th vector:

Long calculations: take the 5th or 9th vector top, subtract it from the actual top (made by another wave) and divide that by the length of the vector trend.
Short calculations: take the 5th or 9th vector bottom, subtract it from the actual bottom, and divide that by the length of the vector trend.

That will give you a percentage of how close the 5th or 9th vector came to the actual top, when it did not make the top itself.

Cordially,
Michael.

Numbers please. Tell me which high you're talking about. Numbers.

Also you said your method was mathematical and verifiable. What mathematics does it use?
 
 
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