ART - not just pretty pics

sminicooper

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Jun 13, 2016
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#43
Another great French artist was the post-Impressionist Georges-Pierre Seurat. To see his pictures for real is fascinating due to his innovative painting technique – (a sort of dotted style reminiscent of those numbered colour cards used to determine colour blindness) – the posh name for his technique is "chromoluminarism and pointillism".

The picture below doesn't really do justice. You can see his work at London's National Gallery – and they've got other good stuff too!

seurat.JPG
 

Pat494

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Mar 27, 2004
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#44
Just staying on the poster theme again.
 

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sminicooper

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#46
London Transport and its predecessors were very adept at using posters to encourage off-peak travel. This Edwardian period example has very much the French look about it.

underground.JPG
 
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Aug 21, 2004
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Manchester
#48
Another great French artist was the post-Impressionist Georges-Pierre Seurat. To see his pictures for real is fascinating due to his innovative painting technique – (a sort of dotted style reminiscent of those numbered colour cards used to determine colour blindness) – the posh name for his technique is "chromoluminarism and pointillism".

The picture below doesn't really do justice. You can see his work at London's National Gallery – and they've got other good stuff too!

View attachment 232350
He was great friends with Paul Signac who developed/ adapted the technique.
Giving his paintings a mosaic like effect.

I did paint this. Quite satisfying actually, being able to create without being fussy.
 

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tomorton

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Feb 28, 2002
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#49
Another great French artist was the post-Impressionist Georges-Pierre Seurat. To see his pictures for real is fascinating due to his innovative painting technique – (a sort of dotted style reminiscent of those numbered colour cards used to determine colour blindness) – the posh name for his technique is "chromoluminarism and pointillism".

The picture below doesn't really do justice. You can see his work at London's National Gallery – and they've got other good stuff too!

View attachment 232350

Really interesting technique, subject very evocative of the period.

Apparently, the big-bustled lady with the parasol is a prostitute, as she has a small monkey on a leash and possibly a small dog: such a pet would allow a gentleman to make an approach in order to talk to / stroke the animal, whereas striking up a direct conversation without having been introduced would have been anathema in such a bourgeois location. Taking a pet along on her "stroll" signifies her availability but also her respect for his dignity / position, and implies a rather higher position within her profession than a street prostitute of Montmartre etc. Interestingly, nobody in the painting looks directly at her/him, the closest other figures have either their backs to her or have slightly averted their gaze: looking directly at them would have been indiscreet and even forward at the time.

Interesting to place this on the right of a composition of Seurats' Bathers at Asnières representing the other side of the river. The Bathers is clearly a representation of the Parisian working classes at leisure, whereas La Grande Jatte shows the bourgeoisie. A youth in the Bathers seems to be shouting (the uncouth fellow!) to (at?) the more proper and staid and fully dressed gentlefolk on the opposite bank. Of course, the middle classes then would not have dreamed of going out in the sun or getting their bodies out in public.
 
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sminicooper

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Jun 13, 2016
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#50
Cartoons – a fantastic and witty resource: especially the social commentary & political pi$$-takers!

Nothing new here though – Hogarth was at it over 250 years ago and somebody has produced a brilliant update.

Gin Lane 1751.JPG Gin Lane 2016.JPG
 

sminicooper

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#51
He was great friends with Paul Signac who developed/ adapted the technique.
Giving his paintings a mosaic like effect.

I did paint this. Quite satisfying actually, being able to create without being fussy.
Wish I had the talent to do that! Always envious of my friends who can do artwork – but at least trading allows me to transfer some of the ill gotten gains to them.
 

Pat494

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Mar 27, 2004
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#52
He was great friends with Paul Signac who developed/ adapted the technique.
Giving his paintings a mosaic like effect.

I did paint this. Quite satisfying actually, being able to create without being fussy.
Well painted CV. You got the style of the Impressionists. Good work.
 
Aug 21, 2004
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#53
Wish I had the talent to do that! Always envious of my friends who can do artwork – but at least trading allows me to transfer some of the ill gotten gains to them.
Sorry I should explain :)

That is the original, but I did a version of it.

Joking apart, give it a go and don't be concerned what anyone things about the results.

£50.00 will get you started. (y)
 

Pat494

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Mar 27, 2004
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#55
Just off to lunch with a millionairess. Hope she doesn't leave me holding the bill !
See you later art fans.
 

timsk

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Mar 18, 2002
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#56
. . . Giving his paintings a mosaic like effect..
As someone who has a formal art training, I can tell you all that mosaics is the area of art to collect. The reason being that for years it's been seen as an old persons hobby, making pot stands with geckos and dolphins etc. Very much craft and not art. It's been so looked down upon by the art establishment, that Nicholas Serota - the former Director of the Tate Gallery - refused to have any mosaic art in the Tate's collection. Given the anti-establishment backlash of late, mosaic art is sure to have its day sooner or later. Get in now while it's still (relatively) cheap. Attached are a few images of a mosaicist whose work I'm rather fond of. I'm fond of the artist too - she's my wife.
Tim.
 

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sminicooper

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Jun 13, 2016
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#57
The Romans were pretty good at mosaics. And they're worth a bob or two if you find any underneath your garden.