Article Introduction To Swing Trading

T2W Bot

Staff member
1,499 115
Swing trading has been described as a kind of fundamental trading in which positions are held for longer than a single day. This is because most fundamentalists are actually swing traders since changes in corporate fundamentals generally require several days or even a week to cause sufficient price movement that renders a reasonable profit.
But this description of swing trading is a simplification. In reality, swing trading sits in the middle of the continuum between day trading to trend trading. A day trader will hold a stock anywhere from a few seconds to a few hours but never more than a day; a trend trader examines the long-term fundamental trends of a stock or index, and may hold the stock for a few weeks or months. Swing traders hold a particular stock for a period of time, generally a few days or two or three weeks, which is between those extremes, and they will trade the stock on the basis of its intra-week or intra-month oscillations between optimism and pessimism...

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Pat Riley

Established member
794 178
What Am I Missing?

I'm sure Jason is a fine chapo, but for the life of me, there's little here to identify hat he;s talking about.

All charts look the same. Doesn't matter by simply trading longer time spans.

Im sure I've lost the plot as I can't imagine you'd headline this article if it's nthing more than I've been able to judge.
 
M

member275544

0 0
I'm of the same opinion
Firstly why start an article to explain the different types of trading which had nothing to do with the rest of the article and then go on to not even adequately explain what swing trading was.
his exit talks about the upper channel and yet nowhere in the article does he ever mention a channel unless you had read the book he was quoting from in case which write an article about that.
He was suggesting that you are effectively trading within ranges, definely not sure thats the definition, or the method of swing trading. Marc Ravilland wrote a whole book on the subject and he certainlt wasn't advocating trading in ranges.

I'd like to see some element of quality control being used because this really was way off the mark
 
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