ART - not just pretty pics

timsk

Legendary member
7,343 2,135
I expect Tim is just itching to show us his work.
So come on ole boy be brave. Who knows we may like it. At least you can expect some good manners if anyone doesn't.
You may hold some of us :D ordinary art critics in contempt but maybe our comments should not be swept into the gutter. We may point you in another and better direction. You never know !
Hi Pat,
Fair enough. I've created a Google Photos album especially for you: For Pat

A couple of things to mention: I describe myself simply as a mosaicist - as opposed to a mosaic artist, as I'm not convinced that anything I produce warrants the art label. Besides which, the art 'elite' in the UK are clear on the matter: mosaics are definitely not art. It's a different story on the continent - especially France and Italy - where they are held in high regard. (Mosaics in general I mean, not mine!) The other thing to point out is that the first piece (black & white circles) is a joint effort with my wife. I designed it and she made it, so the choice of 'tesserae' (i.e. each individual piece of mosaic) are hers.

Feel free to be as damning as you like - go for it. That said, I'll issue you all with a small challenge. If you think a piece (or all of them!) is utter shite - that's absolutely fine - but please explain why you think that. What don't you like about it, e.g. the composition, choice of materials or colours used etc.
Tim.
 
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0007

Senior member
2,376 660
I like your mosaics! The Romans knew a thing or two about mosaics and I remember seeing some remarkable displays on view in Leicester. It was also very interesting to learn how they were laid out to the design – getting the symmetry etc correct using just a piece of string and a couple of pegs. What materials are your mosaics made from and what's the design process?

Lastly – top marks for exhibiting your work & its results – we don't see too many traders doing like this with their stuff!
 
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Pat494

Legendary member
14,491 1,540
Well done Tim answering the challenge.
Have to say not my kind of art but should be good for a carpet or something.
 

timsk

Legendary member
7,343 2,135
. . . Have to say not my kind of art but should be good for a carpet or something.
Hi Pat,
Well, all I can say is well done to you on the ultimate insult that I hadn't seen coming. 10 /10! I was prepared for you to say that my mosaics are utter shite and that your cat could have done better. So, as insults go, I gotta hand to you - comparing my work to an effing ***king carpet is right up there!!!*
Be that as it may, here's hoping that others will offer a more insightful commentary on my work along the lines that I requested.
Tim.
* Nothing against carpets per se: I have a small collection of Kilims that I absolutely adore.
 

timsk

Legendary member
7,343 2,135
I like your mosaics! The Romans knew a thing or two about mosaics and I remember seeing some remarkable displays on view in Leicester. It was also very interesting to learn how they were laid out to the design – getting the symmetry etc correct using just a piece of string and a couple of pegs. What materials are your mosaics made from and what's the design process?

Lastly – top marks for exhibiting your work & its results – we don't see too many traders doing like this with their stuff!
Thanks 0007 - too kind!
The design process starts with a kernel of an idea which I explore with multiple iterations in a sketch book before arriving at a final design that is then scaled up and transferred to the substrate the mosaic is built on - usually MDF or plywood. Each individual tesserae is cut by hand using wheeled nippers and glued in place one at a time. The bulk of my work uses two types of 25mm square tile: unglazed porcelain and glass. The holy grail for most mosaicists is 'Smalti': hand made glass from just two producers in Italy. The precise manufacturing process is a secret and handed down from one generation to the next like a favourite family recipe. Needless to say, it's fearsomely expensive and few can afford to use it as their prime material. The Chinese have tried to mimic it but, as with so many things they copy, the quality isn't there. The roman mosaics you've seen were probably made from natural stone and marble, especially if they were on the the floor - as they're very hard wearing. These materials are still popular with mosaicists today - but they're expensive and the colour palette is limited. If you like the old stuff, the mecca for mosaicists is Ravenna in Italy, which boasts no less than seven (I think) Unesco world heritage sites. Here's a link to another Google Photos album with some snaps I took when I went there a few years ago: Ravenna
Tim.
 
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Pat494

Legendary member
14,491 1,540
Ooooooops Tim are you not being a bit over sensitive ?
Did I not praise your courage ?
You shouldn't have requested praise but earned it imho.
Do you really want me to tell porkies to assuage your ego ?
I was polite as promised. and didn't say whoever gave you an honours degree for such crap must be insane !
:D
 
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timsk

Legendary member
7,343 2,135
Pat,
Ooooooops Tim are you not being a bit over sensitive ?
A number of conditions would need to be met for me to be overly sensitive. Top of the list is that I'd I'd need to respect your opinion.
Did I not praise your courage ?
Yes, you did. Thank you.
You shouldn't have requested praise but earned it imho.
Nowhere have I ever "requested praise". Grrrr!
Do you really want me to tell porkies to assuage your ego ?
No, I was merely hoping for some half intelligent feedback - nothing more.
I was polite as promised. and didn't say whoever gave you an honours degree for such crap must be insane !
That you think it's crap is fine - I have absolutely no issue with that. My beef is that you don't understand the basics about art, evidenced by your inability to offer any reasoning - not one single thing - as to why you think it's crap. Yet the thread title falsely gives members the impression that you know what you're talking about. It's akin to a novice trader whose sole rationale for hitting the buy button is 'it looked like it was about to go up' starting a thread entitled: 'TRADING - not just shoot from the hip gambling'.
Tim.
 

barjon

Legendary member
10,604 1,742
Tim

Enjoyed those pics. Particularly liked the 11th one in - the blue, yellow, green and red crown type piece. What sort of size is it? Must take hours of close work - look after your eyes!
 

timsk

Legendary member
7,343 2,135
Tim

Enjoyed those pics. Particularly liked the 11th one in - the blue, yellow, green and red crown type piece. What sort of size is it? Must take hours of close work - look after your eyes!
Cheers Jon,
Yes, they take a long time to make, in the region of two weeks for the one you've picked out. I can't give an exact size of the piece as it's all wrapped up in bubble wrap and tidied away in the loft. But, roughly, it's about 600mm wide x 500mm high (ish). Btw, it's for sale if you're interested - no reasonable offer refused!
😜
 

0007

Senior member
2,376 660
Tim – I go back a few posts ago where I think you said that one of the first skills an artist need to master is that of drawing. Now I think about it, subconsciously that has been quite apparent for me but I didn't really realise it. When you look at some of the great artists e.g. Leonardo, who appear to me to have been masters of drawing it's again apparent but as a layman it's not until someone formally explains it to you that the full implication is appreciated. It just goes to show that (IMHO) to understand anything properly you do need to take a formal course of instruction – having done that you are then in a much better position to draw your own conclusions, albeit they might be different from your instructor's. All of my favourite Norfolk landscape & wildlife artists start off with their sketchbook and a drawing. And when you look at the work of great artists that has undergone conservation/restoration there always seems to be a drawing underneath.

I do think that your "drawing observation" needs re-emphasis since it seems to have been quietly overlooked in the ensuing discussion. The attached picture (and my camera phone doesn't do it justice) has an incredible amount of drawing underlay and it was that which caught my eye and led to its purchase. My suspicion is that even without the "colouring -in" this would still be an appealing piece of work for me.

269861
 
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timsk

Legendary member
7,343 2,135
. . . I do think that your "drawing observation" needs re-emphasis since it seems to have been quietly overlooked in the ensuing discussion. . .
Hi 0007,
An ability to draw certainly helps a lot and most artists have that skill to a greater or lesser extent - even sculptors. If you ever get the chance to look at the drawings of Henry Moore - don't pass it up - as they're superb. That said, my wife doesn't draw at all - never has - and it doesn't stop her from producing excellent mosaics. Drawing is a skill that can be acquired by anyone - it just takes a lot of practice. A good teacher really helps and I was lucky enough to have a brilliant one. Interestingly, my tutor's own work was conceptual and didn't rely on any drawing skills at all. He produced books - I remember one entitled 'An Acre of Grass' which comprised hundreds of pages of the same image (grass) which, if laid out side by side, would fill an acre. Another was called 'London to New York', which just had horizontal lines on every page which, if put end to end, would stretch from one city to the other!

Anyway, it's clear that the artist(s) who did the blue boat and the landscape you posted knows one end of a pencil from the other - both are well observed. They're similar styles, but the boat in particular is very graphic in style which suggests to me that the artist may make his/her living as an illustrator, technical draughtsman or architect.
Tim.
 

Pat494

Legendary member
14,491 1,540
I am more than satisfied with my own artistic analysis or lack of it.
Of course you probably prefer your own views. Only natural and variety is .........….etc.
Keep smiling through the vagaries of life.
 
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