ART - not just pretty pics

cantagril

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Gilles Aguilera

This chap does today what the Dutch school were doing a couple of hundred years ago....a good bowl of fruit:)

Levity aside, I had occasion to attend one of his exhibitions and the light and warmth that some of stuff gives out I found to be most affecting - this leaving aside any symbolism of the subject.

...and he does more than fruit and veg:

http://lavelatura.com/project/gilles-aguilera-peintre-sculpteur/
 

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Pat494

Legendary member
13,970 1,432
This chap does today what the Dutch school were doing a couple of hundred years ago....a good bowl of fruit:)

Levity aside, I had occasion to attend one of his exhibitions and the light and warmth that some of stuff gives out I found to be most affecting - this leaving aside any symbolism of the subject.

...and he does more than fruit and veg:

http://lavelatura.com/project/gilles-aguilera-peintre-sculpteur/
That picture is just like a photo it is so realistic. But it probably took weeks to paint while a photo takes one click.
To compete with the camera art needs something more................
 

cantagril

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That picture is just like a photo it is so realistic. But it probably took weeks to paint while a photo takes one click.
To compete with the camera art needs something more................
Agreed, and I have to say that any photo of this doesn't really do it justice as is the case with most art. I can assure you that these are much more than attempts to imitate photography.

The painting in the flesh is really something. I grew up in a house with lots of old paintings on the wall which hadn't been cleaned for at least a century and to see some of these gloomy pieces as they were when fresh is a great privilege.
 

sminicooper

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Agreed, and I have to say that any photo of this doesn't really do it justice as is the case with most art. I can assure you that these are much more than attempts to imitate photography.

The painting in the flesh is really something. I grew up in a house with lots of old paintings on the wall which hadn't been cleaned for at least a century and to see some of these gloomy pieces as they were when fresh is a great privilege.
- That is one of the most amazing things: to see an old painting before and after cleaning and restoration. The skill of the people who do it is amazing also.

You can see something similar with wall hung tapestries - the colours have usually faded and the item just doesn't do justice to itself. Occasionally you see one that's been rolled up in a lumber room or otherwise stored without exposure to the light - you then get more of an idea of how magnificent they originally were (and still are in many cases - even those where owners have cut them up to fit their wall despite their original eye-watering cost!).

The most stunning example of this sort of thing that I've seen was at Sulgrave Manor (Oxfordshire - important American Connections). Talented craftspeople had re-created Tudor needlework decorations (bedcovers and that sort of thing - not just tiny things) to the exact same specs. and colours - unbelievably beautiful, rich and vibrant colour, and a total transformation compared to existing originals which have lost their colours and are now just a pale & faded object. Well worth a visit for that alone.
 
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Pat494

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The great thing about ART appreciation is that everyone is equally entitled to their own opinion.
The money men are as clueless as the rest.........
 

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timsk

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The great thing about ART appreciation is that everyone is equally entitled to their own opinion.
The money men are as clueless as the rest.........
Lol Pat, you are a one!
That's akin to saying that no one knows what the markets will do and is entitled to their opinion as to whether they will go up or down. Ergo, you may as well stick your whole wad on a long trade and keep your fingers crossed. As most regular subscribers to this thread know, that isn't the best way to go about it. I can assure you that the 'money men' aren't as clueless as the rest, (hint: that's why they're the money men!), just as constantly profitable traders aren't as clueless as the majority who lose.
Tim.
 
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cantagril

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... you may as well stick you're whole wad on a long trade and keep your fingers crossed. As most regular subscribers to this thread know, that isn't the best way to go about it.......

Is that where I've been going wrong?:D
 

Mr. Charts

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"Money men (and women)" might simply buy what they like, but usually have very good advice from professionals about what is likely to appreciate in value. Many of those art works have great artistic qualities anyway, but some I personally dislike. That doesn't mean they are without merit, just not my cup of tea.
For example, I have given up trying to see real artistic merit in the works of Hirst and Emin.
That might be a personal lack of appreciation or understanding on my part, of course.
The thing about art is how you interact with it and what feelings it engenders in you.
Personally I usually look hard at something which many people believe to be of intrinsic value, as I prefer to be open minded. Sometimes I just don't see it, but many times art enriches or expands something in me.
 
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Pat494

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Lol Pat, you are a one!
That's akin to saying that no one knows what the markets will do and is entitled to their opinion as to whether they will go up or down. Ergo, you may as well stick your whole wad on a long trade and keep your fingers crossed.Tim.
I was trying to refer to personal artistic appreciation, not the supposed value.
The story of Saatchi is interesting and about the money side of art. It is rumoured he looked around the art world to find tomorrow's talent today among young artists. He would buy en masse all the available stock of just such a young artist and then turn on the sales pitch to sell the pictures individually for a huge profit.
 

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