FAQ What trigger(s) do you use to get into a trade ?

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ceydababy

Experienced member
1,122 141
#17
Pullbacks....

I always try and enter on a pullback. This keeps my exposure to a minimum. On FTSE max stop usually 5 points.

I have two MA's and bollinger bands and dependent where the price is when I get the signal, I look for pullbacks to the Bolly Bands or the MA's.

I always drop t/f's too for entries. I find by drilling down I can pinpoint an entry much more clinically than just hitting from my higher t/f.

I guess this is a bit fuzzy and discretionary ! but it seems to work for me.:)
 

options

Senior member
2,374 218
#18
I use Pivots too, I'm a big fan.
i'm aware that there are many variations, but never got my head around Camarillas, Fin Pivots etc.

Does anyone use any such variation, and if so can you explain what the difference is and why you use it ?

Or does everyone just stick with "normal" PPs ?
"...but never got my head around Camarillas"

Gave up on that when she started shagging prince charles...:eek:
 
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options

Senior member
2,374 218
#19
K, to try and get this thread back on track...

What Rathcoole said in his first post does hold a bit of sway. I know a trader who would not even think about trading when winds are very strong around him. (I am being serious now)...(Stop laughing)...

He also doesn't normally trade on a Friday. He calls it traders graveyard day.


Anyway... Support and resistance and pivot points have always worked well for me.

Then letting and having the patience to allow the market to lead you in the correct direction.

The smaller the time frame though the harder it is.
 

jayjay121

Established member
555 31
#20
K, to try and get this thread back on track...

What Rathcoole said in his first post does hold a bit of sway. I know a trader who would not even think about trading when winds are very strong around him. (I am being serious now)...(Stop laughing)...

He also doesn't normally trade on a Friday. He calls it traders graveyard day.


Anyway... Support and resistance and pivot points have always worked well for me.

Then letting and having the patience to allow the market to lead you in the correct direction.

The smaller the time frame though the harder it is.


if your being serious about not trading on fridays, then thats quite mad as fridays has always been really bad for me and i was actually seriously thinking about making it a strict rule that i don't trade on fridays.
 

rathcoole_exile

Veteren member
3,924 766
#21
if your being serious about not trading on fridays, then thats quite mad as fridays has always been really bad for me and i was actually seriously thinking about making it a strict rule that i don't trade on fridays.
many people do the same.
especially when you consider that Fridays, in addition to all the other usual profit taking activity etc, are also the weekly and monthly Options expiration days with all the added volatility that that produces.
 

options

Senior member
2,374 218
#22
Excellent reply Rathcoole grasshopper son. You learn your lessons well...

But. The market being the double edged sword that it is also provides ample opps for the short time frame trader who is not afraid to take those opportunities.

As a general rule though, spot on. A lot of pros take a long weekend. Or at least are done by 10 ish uk time.

Me though, just to be obstropulous, Fridays have always been good to me. Mondays have always been terrible... Some traders do a 3 day week, some do full time for 5 months and take the rest of the year off.

It is whatever works for you.

I would personally only want to make one trade a year.

No. guess not. I would get bored.
 

brutusdog

Guest
759 194
#23
Hi options good to see you about mate hope your well...been a while!

As far as triggers go and nick will already know this the 20ema works great for me, after a divergance setup in the trend of the higher timeframe.
 

jayjay121

Established member
555 31
#24
for me at the moment .........it goes in this order and i like all to be confirming.

regular divergence only (more powerful if part of a 1,2 step pattern)
a broken trendline,
clear of s and r with enough room to make my target,
finally check my dom to see levels are in my favour.

its quite alot and i must admit i sometimes enter trades without all confirming, but when all are very high probability.............
 

fayalac

Established member
560 14
#25
I prefer momentum wih a second trigger which is EMA, i never use an EMA larger than 20 because the longer the period the less sensitivity it can have to short therm movements.
I do these because i do swing trading.
 

jonj

Well-known member
401 9
#26
hi yawl,just a sugestion but why dont people post charts with there explanations??it would be helpful for us newbies.
 

rathcoole_exile

Veteren member
3,924 766
#27
hi yawl,just a sugestion but why dont people post charts with there explanations??it would be helpful for us newbies.
Price was in a BB squeeze (purple dots) obviously caused by lack of overnight volume/movement.
Price had started moving when the squeeze fired off Long at 6.30/7am (turquoise dots and green momentum bars)),
Placed a BuyStop at today's pivot, target R1

(Once I was Long I also placed a Stop & Reverse SellStop just below the Pivot. This obviously wasn't triggered)

Off to the pub....


(NB: This was obviously a trade from few weeks ago, before the Rainy season kicked in, so it was pretty safe to go Long. Of course this month, I'm looking for trades to the Short-side 'cos of all the rain)
 

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Carlosyabrudy

Junior member
37 3
#28
Ive tried this and been successful a few times. This is of course not doable all the time but waiting til the Dow is at an extreme oversold level for the day.... usually marked out by a few bullsih divergances where you see buyers have rallied at lows of the day and had more power than bears.

take today..... first bullish CS at 14.50pm
Second rally at 15.05pm.... EXNTRY at 12,220... exit at 12,260.... US usually has a lot of double tops and head and shoulders. Ive been watching the Dow for a month and a half straight every trading day.

Of course this is all confirmed with MACD and momentum to gather the speed of price changes. MACD set at 12 and 22 based on Alexander Elders recommendations. I find it works better than a 26.

Is this idiocy or is this a semi-good idea?
Opposite applies when the market is bearish...

Edit: And there you have it for today. Nice head and shoulders pattern just finished emerging.
 
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#29
I use swing charts for set-ups, wait for a pull-back against the trend, then watch the daily bars. My entry trigger is the market going back in the direction of the main trend by breaking yesterday's bar. I got about one trade a week, on average, during 2007; less during 2008.
 

FulcrumTrader

Junior member
40 3
#30
For futures trading, my primary means for exact trade entry final determination is a statistically set order flow transition . Through tracking Cumulative Delta at all times for the futures instruments I trade (ES, ZB, DAX, QM, etc), I will never enter my trade for the various set-ups I use until my order flow transition criteria is met.

If I am going to initiate a LONG trade, I want to be sure I join the market into a proper transitional change within the order flow conviction. Once the order flow transitions from sellers having control to buyers having control, to a defined criteria, then I am ready to fire off my LONG entry at that exact moment. I handle LONG or SHORT entries with the same statistical criteria that I have quantified for a proper order flow transition. I feel joining measured momentum at the exact time of entry is a critical aspect to higher probability trading.
 

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