Lord Anton Kreil

Aug 26, 2013
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#61
Cocoz,

Thanks for your feedback on his online course.

Are you trading as Institute Trader? What is your experience?
Did the Institute "kind of" risk monitoring your portfolio, such as you are done something not normal (or a bit risky), you will be actually alerted?

Great to hear...
 
Sep 25, 2012
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#62
Cocoz,

Thanks for your feedback on his online course.

Are you trading as Institute Trader? What is your experience?
Did the Institute "kind of" risk monitoring your portfolio, such as you are done something not normal (or a bit risky), you will be actually alerted?

Great to hear...
Hi, no I am not trading as an institute trader. Using my tools. If you join it nobody tells you anything unless you take the mentoring program up.
Otherwise they can't even see your positions.
 
Jun 17, 2013
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#63
Hi, no I am not trading as an institute trader. Using my tools. If you join it nobody tells you anything unless you take the mentoring program up.
Otherwise they can't even see your positions.
Apart all the nice promises. Do they show their performance ?
Have you got access to any track record ?
 
Aug 19, 2013
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#64
It sounds to me:
1. If you are NOT entering the mentor program, then NO point join as Institute Trader
2. Because, you will just be paying Brokerage Fees to ITPM, without getting any benefit
Then, one must as well pay for the online course, and trade on it's own via Saxo, without signing up as Institute Trader. Hopefully, you will learn something useful from the online course, and implement them correctly
 
Sep 25, 2012
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#65
Apart all the nice promises. Do they show their performance ?
Have you got access to any track record ?
As said I don't care about the institute and I am not a member.
I don't see the point in joining so I am not doing it.
 
Sep 25, 2012
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#66
It sounds to me:
1. If you are NOT entering the mentor program, then NO point join as Institute Trader
2. Because, you will just be paying Brokerage Fees to ITPM, without getting any benefit
Then, one must as well pay for the online course, and trade on it's own via Saxo, without signing up as Institute Trader. Hopefully, you will learn something useful from the online course, and implement them correctly
I don't know about the deal between the institute and the broker. I didn't even know it was Saxo.
If you take the course then you can use any broker you want. You are a free person who just took a course so no strings attached.
 
Aug 19, 2013
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#67
When I open the CFD account, it will say all the good thing about
1. Using a small amount of deposit to buy a bigger position
2. No stamp duty
3. Higher exposure
4. Go short on markets

The downside of trading CFD was not quite mentioned expressly
1. Trading costs on CFD are higher than trading Physical Stock
2. Overnight financing on "long"
3. Borrowing cost on "short" + overnight fianancing
Depend on how long you want to hold the CFD position - trading commissions + financing could kill all your returns (if any)
 
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Aug 19, 2013
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#70
If a Trader deposit £20,000 into CFD Trading Account

CFD v Physical Stock
Buy 10,000 Vodafone (say £2)
- using normal stockbroker, costs are £20,000 (for Voda) + £10-£15 (1 way)trading commission (that's it)...no further charge
- using CFD, trading commission £20,000 x 0.01% = £20 (1 way), £18,000 on leverage x 2.5% overnight financing

If the trader trade for 12 months on CFD using leverage 5 times, 1 year financing cost (excluding trading commission) = £20k x 5 = £100k gross exposure x 2.5% financing = £2,500 (or at least £2,000). Of the £20,000 you initially invested, £2 - £2,500 is paid on financing.
"Short" position, you pay 3 things - trading commissions + borrowing costs + overnight financing.
Without talking about trading profit or loss (as it can go either way), the costs of running the CFD accounts - trading commissions, overnight financing + borrowing cost (if "short")... looks quite expensive... not knowing the fact that if we could ever get a hedge fund job, or make it to the end.

I am sure ITPM will get a cut on trading commissions + god know what + mentoring fees. Looks easy money to me.

Depends on how you view the above, however, "conflict of interest" matter is quite evident to me (on a personal opinion).
 
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timsk

Well-known member
Mar 18, 2002
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#72
If Anton can't get a hedge fund job what chance do you have after paying for his course?
Well pb, perhaps he wasn't trying to get one? I don't know one way or the other but, if he wasn't, then it's no surprise he doesn't work for one. Of course, if you know otherwise - then fair play to you!

ex Goldman Sachs Trader Tells Truth about Trading - Part 1 - YouTube

All I can say for sure is that according to the interview linked above (over 6 parts), he claims to have placed a number of his students that have completed his training into hedge funds. Apologies - I can't remember where - probably in one of the latter parts.
Tim.
 

timsk

Well-known member
Mar 18, 2002
6,789
1,740
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#75
I bought the PTM course too, I believe AK is advocating pairs trading, which is risky...
Hi genetrade,
Welcome to T2W.

I don't pairs trade, so I'm not its cheer leader and I have no connection to Anton Kreil who you believe advocates it to his students. That said, I thought Lex Van Dam's article was a bit weak. Yes, there are risks with pairs trading and disaster can strike at any time. But, that applies to all types of trading - risk is what traders deal with. Traders who don't embrace risk aren't traders and won't reap the rewards. The billionaire businessman who committed suicide didn't need to be in a pairs trade to incur the losses he did; a naked short position on VW would have ended the same way. From my limited understanding of that tragic case, it looks to me as if his demise was caused by very poor risk and money management - as opposed to a poor choice in trading strategy.

Generally speaking, pairs trading involves less risk than straight directional plays and, all other things being equal, the trader is protected from the gyrations of the market. Yes, one leg (or both) can go 'off-piste' and not perform as it 'should', but a good trader will expect that to happen from time to time and be prepared for it when it does. IMO, it would be a mistake to dismiss pairs trading on the basis of this one article; get a balanced view before deciding whether or not it's for you.
Tim.