Brighton Business School

Feb 5, 2006
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#1
Hy!
I'm actually 18 and from Vienna. I have to decide now what I want to study next year and where I wanns study. I wanna do later in my life something with the Stock Market or Invesment Banking. Not necessarily a Trader. but maybe. But I wanna get a good academic background for the Financial Markets. I have looked for many programms, and one of my favourites is actually the Brighton Business School

I didn't found any other university which offers such a specific Capital Market program. Another option could also be the University of Reading, but they have very high entry requirements, so I don't believe that I have a chance of admission there.

So I wanna ask you what do u think of the program? Do u know another univerity with a maybe better course? Has the Brighton Business School a good reputation?

I thought that I should make the Bachelor at the Brighton University and then to change for my Master at the London Metropolian University. There they offer the "Fund Managment" Master degree, which sounds aussume, cause that's exactly that what I wanna do.

Thx for every respond!
 

Jack o'Clubs

Well-known member
Sep 7, 2005
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#2
Hi - I need to be careful what I say, as I'm an alumni of BBS, and don't want to do myself down! Just be aware that although the Business School has a good reputation in itself, Brighton is not a particularly well regarded University. It's an ex-Polytechnic - I was there in its Poly years, so nothing wrong with that, except that realistically it can't compete reputationally with Oxbridge or the red-bricks. Whether this is important for you or not depends on your career path.

Going into industry it's not likely to be a problem - certainly wasn't for me. I got on a good graduate scheme with a 'blue-chip' employer straight away on the reputation from the Business School. But frankly the City is different - I can say that as I ended up there. Frankly, having been involved in recruiting for the equities floor of an investment bank, there is no way that a graduate of Brighton University would have got through the door. My advice, if you want to go into financial markets from graduating, is do a 'numerate' degree (Economics, some kind of mathematics, physics, etc) at the best University you can apply to: Oxford, Cambridge, London School of Economics, etc. In my humble opinion, and speaking as one of its graduates, Brighton Business School / University just doesn't come across strongly enough on a CV.

On the plus side, Brighton must be one of the best places in the world to be a student...!
 
Feb 5, 2006
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#3
The problem is that my marks aren't very good. I was always intersted in the financial markets, I read financial newspapers and books since I m 14... When other student learned for the school, I read finacial books. So I have (for my age, not generally!) high financial skills and knowledge, but my marks aren't good enough for a real Top-University. I know that it would have been more clever to learn for the school instead studieng the markets, but now it's too late.

And another, for me very important, advantage for the BBS is: The "International Finance and Capital Markte Studies" is exactly that for what I m searching. I didn't found any other university which offers the same or something in that direction.

Another question: How big are the chances to make the Bachelor in Brighton and then to change, if the marks are good enough - we ll see - to change for the Master Program to a Top-University like Oxford/Cambridge/ or something else? Is the reputation of the BBS good enough that Top-Universitys accept you?

And: How ist the Reputation of the Metropolian University in London? I don't believe that it's better, cause (i think) that there are more than 30 000 students, but I don't know.

Thanks for the Replys!
 

Jack o'Clubs

Well-known member
Sep 7, 2005
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#4
I would think again about getting an over-specific degree. Any numerate degree is going to demonstrate to an employer that you're able to pick up the ropes, but if you end up with a degree in International Finance and Capital Markets, what if in the next three years you decide you actually want to go into marketing? Picking an overly specific degree might close some options for you. It's easy to explain why, having done Business Studies, you want to go into banking, less easy to explain at an interview why you've spent three years doing IF&CM and now want to work in something different. The graduate trader I worked most closely with had a degree in Chemical Engineering, if I remember right. The key point was that he was very very bright, had chosen a challenging degree, and had come from a good university.

To answer your question, if you were excellent at BBS you could probably go on to the LSE, Oxford or wherever to do a post-grad qualification.

I don't know a lot about London Metropolitan University, but it sounds like another of the ex-Polytechnics. I am sure perfectly reasonable, but low on prestige. Does this matter? Yes, if a prospective employer thinks similarly.

Look here for UK university reputations - you can argue about some of the specific rankings, but overall a good summary of where the universities rank.

http://education.guardian.co.uk/uni...e/0,,-5163901,00.html?start=0&index=3&index=3
 

Mayfly

Active member
Nov 7, 2001
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#5
Dons 'accepting students they know will fail

You asked about London Metropolitan University?

London Guildhall and the University of North London, which merged to become London Metropolitan University, had the worst drop-out rates at 35 per cent and 39 per cent, respectively
You’ll find that this came from a news item in the Daily Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...i15.xml&sSheet=/news/2004/08/15/ixhome.html""

It’s best to avoid, don’t you think?

Anyway, I wouldn’t underestimate your chances of being accepted at better institution, mainly on the grounds that your language skills seem perfectly adequate to me – I’m assuming that German is your mother’s tongue? And I guess that your maths must be OK if you’re comfortable about taking a course with an emphasis on quantitative methods?

Anyway, I agree with JoC when he says that “the key point was that he was very bright, had chosen a challenging degree, and had come from a good university.”

HTH

Cheers

Mayfly
 
Feb 5, 2006
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#6
Yes, my mother's tongue is German. And no, I am not really good in Maths, because I don't like Geometry, and in Austria you do in the last 2 years nearly only geometry. As we learned statistics, I was really good, but now we are doing again this boring things. That's really unfair, because Geometry isn't important for a course with an emphasis on quantitative methods. But who knows (and accepts the fact) in England that we are doing in Austria in the last 2 years mainly Geometry? Nobody.

But I will try to apply also at the better universitys like St.Andrews, Bradford or Warwick for a place. Maybe they give me the chance for an interview where I can show them my enthusiasm and my high motivation. And maybe they will also consider that I have already intermediate accounting skills (learned it privately with professionel univeristy books). And Geometry is surely more reliable than Accounting.
 
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Jack o'Clubs

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Sep 7, 2005
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#7
Aim high. Your English is clearly outstanding, and unlike 90% of UK undergraduates you obviously have ambition. I'd make the likes of Warwick and St Andrews your first ports of call over BBS. Good luck.
 
Feb 5, 2006
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#8
In Austria nearly everybody who visits the last year at grammar school has nearly the same English skills like me. I am even not one of the best in my year. There are many others (especially the girls) who are better. I am in the middle-field, not bad, but also not very good.

I am now interested in the course "Accounting & Finance" because nearly every university offers this course and so I have a wider choice and the chance to go to a better university is bigger.
 
Feb 5, 2006
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#9
Today I became an Information Guide from the Bradford University, which seems to be also a nice university. But there is one thing which "shocked" me.

From the booklet:

For entry in Sept. 2006, you should aim to complete and return your application form for receipt by UCAS after Sept. 2005 and BEFORE 15 JANUARY 2006.

Today is the 22.February 2006. Does that mean that it is impossible for me to apply to a british university for the semester 2006? In Austria the "Apply-Limit" is always the 1.7, so I thought that it's the same in England. Is ther any university where it's still possible to apply or am I too late for the next year (September 2006)?
 

Jack o'Clubs

Well-known member
Sep 7, 2005
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#10
In short, don't know, but UCAS is the British universities' entrance and clearing house and may have its own deadlines. As you're applying from overseas I suggest you phone the Universities that you're shortlisting and ask them directly. Bradford is a sh1thole by the way...
 
Feb 5, 2006
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#12
Why do the Ex-Polys have a worser reputation than the "old" universitys? Maybe they have also a good staff and good programs?
And: Is the "Quality Assurance Agency" a serious agency? They rated the programs of the London Metropolian. There are some courses which got "24 of 24 ponints" and many which got "22/23 of 24 points"...
 
May 26, 2003
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#13
Forget about the UCAS deadlines - they are intended for the bulk application of home students. Contact the universities directly, speak to the admissions tutor within the school and remenber this is now a very competative free market - they want/need you (your money) as much as you want
to to attend their institution (a lot more at most universities).
 

Charlton

Well-known member
Nov 23, 2003
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#14
Be confident

Iti0087 said:
There are many others (especially the girls) who are better. I am in the middle-field, not bad, but also not very good.
Don't doubt yourself - it's irrelevant how good the English of your fellow pupils is. Just work on expressing your enthusiasm and knowledge - think of some vocabulary and phrases you might use at the interview.

Iti0087 said:
Yes, my mother's tongue is German. And no, I am not really good in Maths, because I don't like Geometry, and in Austria you do in the last 2 years nearly only geometry. As we learned statistics, I was really good, but now we are doing again this boring things.
Don't dwell on the negative and certainly do not mention this at an interview. Tell them that you really enjoy statistics and that this is something you would like to take further at university. Ask them if the course includes modules on stats.

Iti0087 said:
That's really unfair, because Geometry isn't important for a course with an emphasis on quantitative methods.
Life is unfair. It doesn't always go the way you want it to go, but you CAN manipulate it.

Iti0087 said:
But who knows (and accepts the fact) in England that we are doing in Austria in the last 2 years mainly Geometry? Nobody.
Re-iterating my earlier point, don't tell them that maths was boring. Tell them that you are very enthusiastic about stats, but would have wished that it formed a larger part of your maths at school.

Iti0087 said:
But I will try to apply also at the better universitys like St.Andrews, Bradford or Warwick for a place. Maybe they give me the chance for an interview where I can show them my enthusiasm and my high motivation.
Look at the course literature, reputations etc and decide which ones you would really like to go to and apply for them. DO NOT TAKE SECOND BEST according to your own system of evaluation. However don't get too bogged down in whether x is better than y - just grade them using your own reasonably wide categories. Unless you get advice from people who have been to these places you can't really tell and, even then, their advice will contain some bias one way or another.

Be positive and you will surprise yourself and receive a large boost of confidence. Even if you don't get into your first choice the UK system is well-organised for getting people into the courses of their choice.

Iti0087 said:
And maybe they will also consider that I have already intermediate accounting skills (learned it privately with professionel univeristy books)..
Do point this out at interview. It is important for your choice of course. Be able to quote examples and which books you read to back up your claims during the interview.

For further details on university admissions procedures in the UK visit http://www.ucas.ac.uk/

Also take into account other factors besides course content e.g. the university environment - do you want to spend 3 years in the middle of a big city e.g. London or in a campus style university ?. How important is it to be able to travel back to Austria easily ? Is it important to be located in certain areas for extra-curricular activitiies e.g. climbing, sailing, surfing

Finally good luck

Charlton
 
Feb 5, 2006
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#15
Thank you for the very motivating and helpful Post. I prefer a campus style university, because I want to experience this typical UK/US-Universityambience. I would prefer a bigger campus, not a small one, because there are more partys,girls, etc...

And there is another very important factor:
I'm stuttering. When I talk in German, it's not very obviously (only when I am very nervous, under pressure or reading in front of the class). But in English, because I don't have real practice in it, it's very hard. I think that it would need 6 months or so to normalise my language (It won't disappear, only get better). So I don't think that the chance to leave a good impression at the first interview isn't very high, because through fear to stutter I am scared to talk in my normal English but talk in a very simple English. In combination with my bad marks, it may result to a Knock-Out.
In my moment school it isn't a real problem. My teachers know that I am a smart guy and that it's better not to make me reading in front of my class. I am also very popular in the school, cause I am known as a funny School-Clown and good-looking guy ;) :cheesy:
I want to say that I am fully integrated (I m with the hottest girl of our school together) and not a strange outsider. The problem is that when I talk in English my stuttering is very obvious...

So what do you think, what should, what can I do?
I am really motivated, because I want to study Finance ot something else in UK.
 

Charlton

Well-known member
Nov 23, 2003
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#16
Iti0087 said:
So what do you think, what should, what can I do?
I am really motivated, because I want to study Finance ot something else in UK.
I've sent you a private message (PM) on this

Charlton
 
Feb 5, 2006
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#18
At the moment (I still don't received all prospects) the University of Essex is my favourite. The have a single Finance program with some Accounting courses. I prefer Finance then Accounting & Finance, because there are also Futures & Options courses and there are generally more stock market elements.

But the Cass Bussines School sounds also great. Especially the Investment and Financial Risk Managment Program sound very interesting. But I read that the Cass is a "Top Business Scholl with very limitated places". Is that only advertisment or is it really true? If it's true, my chances would be very small...

Cheers
 
#19
well iti, I'm applying to Cass in Banking and also in the Investments Course

At least in the Banking course they do still have vacancies...


BTW do u have a matura? I got an Abitur and the minimum required was a 2.1,,,
 
Feb 5, 2006
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hmenke said:
well iti, I'm applying to Cass in Banking and also in the Investments Course
At least in the Banking course they do still have vacancies...
BTW do u have a matura? I got an Abitur and the minimum required was a 2.1,,,
I will make my Mature in 10-11 weeks.
A 2.1 at the Matura will be very hard. The average marks with which the pupils leave ours school was ie in the las year 3.3 ...
Hmmmm...