New Desktop

gedward3

Established member
925 116
I'm looking to purchase a new desktop and 2 or 3 monitors for purely trading purposes. I was thinking of 6 or 8GB Ram,GB or a bit more Hard Drive with a decent graphics card to run 2 or 3 monitors. Not really up to date with chips these days so any advice would be appreciated. Would like to get this for gbp1000 if possible and I live in Hong Kong so would need to be delivered.

Any advice and links much appreciated


Ged
 

A Dashing Blade

Experienced member
1,373 170
Take a look here for ideas.
Affordable All-Rounder August 2012 | bit-tech.net[/URL]

Tbh £500 of box (ie no monitors) will be more than sufficiant. You don't need a bang-up-to-date, top-of-the-range chip to process real-time data. In fact an old dual-core would do.

However can personally recommend the Radeon 7850 graphic cards, very powerful, very quiet. I run two Dell 2711 monitors off mine.
 
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0007

Senior member
2,295 596
Intel SandyBridge / IvyBridge CPU with appropriate motherboard will run 2 monitors off their integral graphics chip - fine for trading and office type apps - and very fast. Add a £20-£30 graphics card (last year's now unfashionable model) and you can run 4 monitors no problem (again, get suitable motherboard). Unsuitable for high-end Video editing but that's not our game is it.
 

trader9281

Junior member
46 1
I would recommend splashing on screens though :)
 

Smooth

Junior member
15 0
I'm looking to purchase a new desktop and 2 or 3 monitors for purely trading purposes. I was thinking of 6 or 8GB Ram,GB or a bit more Hard Drive with a decent graphics card to run 2 or 3 monitors. Not really up to date with chips these days so any advice would be appreciated.
I used to keep track of chips, MIPS, increasing number of cores, platforms, L1 and L2 cache and cache speeds etc etc.

I've given up. For most purposes, including trading, the exact CPU is not really relevant any more. Video editing might make heavy demands on CPUs (though more so on data transfers i.e. RAM/HDD speeds), but even that can be done on any modern PC with very little problem.

The same with GPUs (graphics cards). If it has the desired number of outputs, then it's going to meet most traders' requirements. And, as per a previous post, there's the possibility of adding a second graphics card if you need it. The physical insertion of a new card is a relatively simply job but I suggest you get the PC manufacturer to install it before shipping even if it means paying a little bit more.
 

canaussieuck

Member
50 0
CHeck out falcon trading computers...that's where I'm ordering my next machine from. Can't even get a decent machine built with a good multi monitor card in china.

CanOz
 

ast4

Junior member
14 0
I have no idea why some retail level traders are preoccupied with having a high spec system. The last two firms I've worked for have used pretty low-end machines for actual trading, at least compared to these ridiculous falcon computers. You're not playing games on this thing.

A system with 4 GB of ram and decent CPU should be more than sufficient if it's just for trading. If you're doing research, that should be an entirely different system to begin with.

You could just pick up a refurbished dell precision T3500 for under US$350, throw in another quadro and call it a day.
 

canaussieuck

Member
50 0
It totally depends on your needs. Running NT with 6 screens takes some power. I don't use allot of indicators but if you start popping them on then soon NT starts to use resources. I've decided to try and build a PC for the first time. The Falcon machines are expensive but they last a long time...

I just want something fast for backtesting, that works well with multiple screens.

CanOz
 

ast4

Junior member
14 0
It's not so much processing power that you'll need but rather a beefy PSU. If you want to do it "right". Then have 1 machine dedicated to backtesting and 1 machine dedicated to trading. The actual trading machine doesn't need to at all powerful, but the backtesting machine should depending on what you're done.

To give you an idea of what I'm working with. The trading machine has 2.0 ghz core 2 duo with 4 gb of ram and dual quadro FX540 which I picked up for $300 (refurbished dell lease computer). The backtesting system on the other hand has dual xeon E5-2620 w/ 64 GB ECC RAM, 4 TB RAID 0.

While a trading machine doesn't require much power, you don't want it to get bogged down while you're backtesting during trading hours. Separating the systems is really the way to go. Every single firm I've worked for has done this as well.
 

Sanity

Junior member
29 2
It's not so much processing power that you'll need but rather a beefy PSU. If you want to do it "right". Then have 1 machine dedicated to backtesting and 1 machine dedicated to trading. The actual trading machine doesn't need to at all powerful, but the backtesting machine should depending on what you're done.

To give you an idea of what I'm working with. The trading machine has 2.0 ghz core 2 duo with 4 gb of ram and dual quadro FX540 which I picked up for $300 (refurbished dell lease computer). The backtesting system on the other hand has dual xeon E5-2620 w/ 64 GB ECC RAM, 4 TB RAID 0.

While a trading machine doesn't require much power, you don't want it to get bogged down while you're backtesting during trading hours. Separating the systems is really the way to go. Every single firm I've worked for has done this as well.
Def agree.... If you can afford it, go with a PCI-ex SSD card too....
 

ast4

Junior member
14 0
Def agree.... If you can afford it, go with a PCI-ex SSD card too....
Definitely if one could afford it SSD would be nice, especially if many of your problems require random access. Often time though sequential access is what is needed for backtesting type problems and speed benefits there are not worth the price differential.

We also run tesla c2075s which really speed up some processes, especially if you're generating random numbers. Just load the numbers on the GPU and transfer to memory.
 

rawrschach

Experienced member
1,223 277
You can't buy computers in Hong Kong?

What dyou need all that RAM/GPU power for? Trading requires practically no computer power.
 

Sanity

Junior member
29 2
Definitely if one could afford it SSD would be nice, especially if many of your problems require random access. Often time though sequential access is what is needed for backtesting type problems and speed benefits there are not worth the price differential.

We also run tesla c2075s which really speed up some processes, especially if you're generating random numbers. Just load the numbers on the GPU and transfer to memory.
Tesla, Nice.... SSD is good for random, yes, but also for sequential. Can get well over 1,000MBytes/sec if you need it!

Having said all that, if it's just back testing on Metatrader, probably not worth all that - just go for a fast cpu....
 

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