Aspergers and Pattern-spotting

trendie

Legendary member
6,536 1,129
I am reminded of this idea when I recently read an article about SAP, a software corporation, that was intending to actively seek to employ people with higher functioning autism, or Aspergers Syndrome.

The reasoning was that Aspies, as they are affectionately referred to, whilst having a under-developed sense of social interactivity, have powerful observational skills, pattern-spotting skills, etc, and a general tendency towards perfectionism. In a software or system-testing environment, such skills would be a premium.

I was wondering if autistic people would make better pattern-spotters, and better at finding patterns in a river of number-driven data?
Would they make better traders?

Considering the kind of behaviour on some threads, you would think under-developed social skills was a qualifying skill to belong to this board, but that aside, would you regard yourself as having autistic tendencies, such as confidence with numbers, acute pattern-spotting skills, seeking perfectionism?
 

Shakone

Senior member
2,458 665
Interesting thought.

I don't know a lot about Asperger's, so I'd like to ask is the difficulty in social situations related to a poor pattern spotting ability when it comes to emotional signals, nuance, accepted behaviour etc.? Given an emotional component to the market, this may hinder them a great deal in trading.

I'm a little sceptical about the existence of many of these syndromes and disorders.
 
M

member275544

0 0
, would you regard yourself as having autistic tendencies, such as confidence with numbers, acute pattern-spotting skills, seeking perfectionism?

thats me in a nutshell, and I work for SAP already
 

new_trader

Legendary member
6,541 1,419
I am reminded of this idea when I recently read an article about SAP, a software corporation, that was intending to actively seek to employ people with higher functioning autism, or Aspergers Syndrome.

The reasoning was that Aspies, as they are affectionately referred to, whilst having a under-developed sense of social interactivity, have powerful observational skills, pattern-spotting skills, etc, and a general tendency towards perfectionism. In a software or system-testing environment, such skills would be a premium.

I was wondering if autistic people would make better pattern-spotters, and better at finding patterns in a river of number-driven data?
Would they make better traders?

Considering the kind of behaviour on some threads, you would think under-developed social skills was a qualifying skill to belong to this board, but that aside, would you regard yourself as having autistic tendencies, such as confidence with numbers, acute pattern-spotting skills, seeking perfectionism?

I *can't stand* people but I like numbers...so, yeah!
 

Mr. Charts

Legendary member
7,367 1,184
"Considering the kind of behaviour on some threads, you would think under-developed social skills was a qualifying skill to belong to this board..."


:LOL::LOL::LOL:
 

Purple Brain

Experienced member
1,613 179
trendie - My sister-in-law adopted a baby which was diagnosed early on with Asperger’s. He’s now 21 and if self-employed as a landscape gardener and leading as normal a life as is possible under those conditions. Even as a small child he was fascinated, perhaps obsessed would be a better term, with road works and infrastructure developments and which parts of major works were outsourced to which companies. Seriously detailed stuff. We were convinced he would get into architecture or construction or something related.

Thinking along the lines you refer to I once asked him to look at my charts and see if he could spot anything. It was obviously more than an academic interest in his condition from my point of view, but I was honest with him as to the various levels of interest I had in the experiment.

He saw nothing. Just a jumble of lines and marks and asked me what was I thinking spending all my time looking at this stuff. When I finished laughing at the turnabout, it made me wonder then, as now, whether we’re all somewhere along the Autistic/Asperger’s spectrum. The traditional definition of extrovert and introvert probably cuts life up into neater slices than is warranted. Just as the checklist for psychopathic tendencies seems to get far more ticks than we’d admit to being comfortable with for most high-achieving individuals.

If being a psychopathic OCD idiot savant was all that was required, I’m sure there would be a ready market for their resources, but to date, I’ve not seen anything to suggest that is the case.
 

NVP

Legendary member
37,549 1,995
I have a dear friend who has looked after a boy with Aspergers since he was deserted by his parents...........hes in his 20's now

We did some experiments a while back ...............he loved my strengthmeter aproach and the 8 multicoloured lines I use for currencies that appealled to his specific skills

he certainly called trades for a while ..........but he couldnt explain why .....he just said he liked a pattern or shape and to buy / sell certain currencies in that pattern

we balanced out evens.........but he still loves the Game ..........

so no mind blowing outcomes here ..........sorry
N
 

trendie

Legendary member
6,536 1,129
http://www.aspietests.org/raads/

Come on, all you Rain Men/Women/Persons.
I took the test yesterday, but didnt upload my results until now, as I got side-tracked ordering my CDs in Genre/Bass Guitarist order.
 

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mlawson71

Active member
154 3
I don't think we can make a sweeping generalization about people on the autism spectrum. Some might be quite good at it, others may not see anything. And even if someone is good at it, they'd still require additional special training like every other trader out there.
 

kalott

Established member
700 64
those who trade DAX should test for this? ;)

http://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/adult-adhd

"Impulsivity
Impulsiveness in someone with ADHD can manifest in several ways:

interrupting others during conversation
being socially inappropriate
rushing through tasks
acting without much consideration to the consequences
A person’s shopping habits are often a good indication of ADHD. Impulse buying, especially on items they can’t afford, is a common symptom of adult ADHD."
 

counter_violent

Legendary member
10,514 2,784
Kinell,
Only scored 38.0
Must be summit wrong with me !

So, I got my youngest lad to do the test. He is an aspie. Thankfully, he was diagnosed whilst still in the school system so educational corrective measures and help were put in place. He hated school for the most part but did get better at dealing with it.
Some issues carried over into college but after the porn posting incident on another girl students pc (normal teen behaviour isn't it ?) everything came to a head. A meeting was convened where we had to attend and were subjected to 45mins of expulsion talk. When they had finished berating and laying the law down, we decided they had not for one second taken into account his condition and our reply was scathing. I have never seen so many professionals back track in such a manner. I bet they wish now that they hadn't been so hasty to criticise. Some of them were trying to get under the table.:LOL:

PS...He is still in college and doing well.
We no longer receive weekly letters complaining about behaviour and other assorted issues. Peaceful it is these days !

His results.
 

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