Long term investor but interested in learning short term trading

worldinvest

Newbie
1 2
Hi. I've invested long term on AIM and Nasdaq. Particular interest in AIM tech stocks. Often I hold for months or years.

On AIM I find it difficult to understand at what point I should exit. For example one AIM stock I hold is up 10%, 20% one month but then back down again the month after. This stock is speculative but they have a lot of big deals with larger companies so until they make it big the waters are very choppy. So close to a buy out but sometimes I wonder if I should of sold part of my portfolio on the last peaks. Exit is the hardest part of the game. Of course a buy out would make this easy for me..

I wan't to learn more about trading in particular day trading / swing trading and to understand how to read charts and decide how to enter and exit trades. Currently I buy stocks based on future speculation in terms of companies I believe in (tech stocks that will flourish in the future).

Hope I can learn more from this forum. If anyone has any recommendations of books, courses or youtube videos to watch to start learning how to read charts this would be highly beneficial. There is so much information and I'm unsure where I should start.
 

timsk

Legendary member
7,336 2,125
. . . Hope I can learn more from this forum. If anyone has any recommendations of books, courses or youtube videos to watch to start learning how to read charts this would be highly beneficial. There is so much information and I'm unsure where I should start.
Hi worldinvest,
Welcome to T2W.

To use an athletics analogy, at the moment you're Mo Farah and you're wanting to become Usain Bolt. If, relatively speaking, you're good at being Mo Farah, I'd recommend you stick with it, for the same reasons as the long distance legend wouldn't attempt (or probably be able, even) to switch to sprinting and compete against the 100 metre ace. However, assuming you ignore me (most people do - with good reason no doubt), and plough ahead anyway, you could do worse than to check out the links in my signature.
Tim.
 

marcela 2020

Member
70 2
Perhaps this will help you, you must overcome execution errors and enter a non-execution phase, where you still lack confidence, discipline in monitoring and feedback from daily management. With the support of tutorials, practical workshops, you must be an abil trader, apply the theory and procedures of the trading method, in such a way that you manage to maintain good performance on a daily basis.
 

Mirardana

Member
65 4
Still, it seems to me that long-term prospects are something more reliable in our time, because it is thanks to this we can wait for some difficult and unexpected moments. And since now the market can be perceived as particularly difficult, I would probably advise you (at least at this point) to continue your work in the familiar format. I know that each of us should change something from time to time, because it can be a new and bright stage in our career. But still, if you decide to take some new moments, I think you should act as carefully as possible, because any changes are already a lot of stress, so take your time, act in stages and I wish you great success.
 

absence

Junior member
36 5
Welcome to the forum. Wishing you all the best in looking for the right person to share
 

postman

Legendary member
25,583 3,123
So many of these going around lately...
Lots of people out of work desperate to try anything for money. They hear you can make make a fortune on 'stonks' and just want someone to tell them what to buy.
I'm not saying this is happening here just, it is happening.
 
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postman

Legendary member
25,583 3,123
Hi. I've invested long term on AIM and Nasdaq. Particular interest in AIM tech stocks. Often I hold for months or years.

On AIM I find it difficult to understand at what point I should exit. For example one AIM stock I hold is up 10%, 20% one month but then back down again the month after. This stock is speculative but they have a lot of big deals with larger companies so until they make it big the waters are very choppy. So close to a buy out but sometimes I wonder if I should of sold part of my portfolio on the last peaks. Exit is the hardest part of the game. Of course a buy out would make this easy for me..

I wan't to learn more about trading in particular day trading / swing trading and to understand how to read charts and decide how to enter and exit trades. Currently I buy stocks based on future speculation in terms of companies I believe in (tech stocks that will flourish in the future).

Hope I can learn more from this forum. If anyone has any recommendations of books, courses or youtube videos to watch to start learning how to read charts this would be highly beneficial. There is so much information and I'm unsure where I should start.
If you want a quick guide to making high probability profit ...
1. find an account that will let you trade out of hours.
2. Buy the dow / s&p (etf futures whatever) immediately after the market close and close your position just before the open.


  • For more than 20 years, the stock market has made its most significant gains at the same time: overnight.
  • After-hours trading for the S&P 500 has generated almost 600% while intraday gains are flat since 1993.
  • The phenomenon has been even more pronounced since the great March 2020 selloff.
.
 
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postman

Legendary member
25,583 3,123
So tonight as an example.
Dow closes 27,995 and 8 minutes later its 28040 thats 45 points in 8 minutes, on a high probability trade. Day after day after day.
 
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