Think it's hot today ?

This is a discussion on Think it's hot today ? within the The Foyer forums, part of the Off the Grid category; Originally Posted by Glenn No cover on the calls ? 140 pts away today. Flippin 'eck, you are bearish just ...

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Old Jun 10, 2004, 2:10pm   #16
 
RogerM's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn
No cover on the calls ? 140 pts away today.
Flippin 'eck, you are bearish just a tad then ? :-)
I tend not to cover the calls 'cos I can always either hedge them with futures, or more likely, roll them out into July if they look like going into the money and staying there. I always like to have cover for the puts tho' cos not only can markets collapse a long way overnight, the implied volatility would surge enormously as well so it would be a double hit. It would be nice to cover the calls, but ultimately we are being paid to carry a risk, and if the risk is removed then so is all the potential profit!
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Old Jun 10, 2004, 4:11pm   #17
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn
Hi Ivor
It's a Dobsonian F6.4 with 10inch mirror. I built it a few years ago
Mostly made from 3/4" plywood and gas pipe.
Very stable and smooth.
From Richard Berry's book "Build your own telescope". Excellent.

Took it to a local Primary school on the day of the transit and had all the children and teachers looking at Venus in small groups. Good fun- lots' of oooh's and aaah's.
Sadly no sunspots around to see on the day.
Also showed them the rotation of the earth. Lady headteacher said I made the earth move for her - lol.

Glenn
That's a very nice looking 'scope. And very impressed that you made it yourself !

I've got a Meade LX200 'GoTo' scope. Had some great views of Jupiter and Saturn a few weeks ago. Even my wife was impressed.

Regards,
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Old Jun 10, 2004, 7:56pm   #18
 
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Originally Posted by ivorm
That's a very nice looking 'scope. And very impressed that you made it yourself !

I've got a Meade LX200 'GoTo' scope. Had some great views of Jupiter and Saturn a few weeks ago. Even my wife was impressed.

Regards,
Glad you like it, thx. A labour of love. Lots of Cuprinol and Hammerite.

J and S are pretty impressive aren't they. Must be nice to let the scope do the finding :-)
Have you put a CCD camera on it and connected it to your PC in the house ? Oh the luxury of staying indoors :-)
I made a home-made Poncet platform to sit mine on. Pretty unwieldy but works ok. Problem is how long it takes to set it all up, inevitably/necessarily on a cold night - brrrrrr :-)

Glenn
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Old Jun 25, 2004, 11:13pm   #19
 
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Originally Posted by pkfryer
Thats excellent pic! You got any others taken from your telescope?
Just took this through the eyepiece with a digital cam - lucky shot.
Low magnification Moon.
Jupiter up tonight but too much heat haze.

Glenn
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Old Jun 27, 2004, 6:07pm   #20
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Excellent scope glenn! You have rekindled my long standing interest in telescopes and star gazing! I think I might invest in a nice big telescope in the not too distant future. I'm impressed you made the scope yourself, it looks very well made!

That picture of the moon looks very impressive very sharp and focused.

How did you demonstrate the earth moving during the day?
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Old Jun 28, 2004, 11:34am   #21
 
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Glenn started this thread "How did you demonstrate the earth moving during the day?"

Simple.
When you look at an object (Sun, Moon or whatever) with a fixed telescope, the telescope moves with the earth's rotation, whereas the object stays where it is.
So in the eyepiece you can see the object slowly drifting across the field of view as the earth rotates.
The higher the magnification you use, the faster the object moves.
It is quite spooky to realise how quickly the earth is rotating and to actually see it for youself.
The teachers were pretty impressed.
(****** Of course you NEVER look directly at the Sun through a telescope !!!!!!******)
I was projecting the Sun's image on to a piece of paper shaded inside a box. So everyone could see the sun gradually move across the paper.

"That picture of the moon looks very impressive very sharp and focused."
Well it's not bad is it, but on a cold still winter night it would be much better. When you are looking at individual craters with high magnification, you need the best seeing conditions.
If I'd zoomed in it woud be fuzzy at crater detail level because of the turbulence in the earth's atmosphere from the day's hot sun.

Funnily enough a number of people have said they are interested in astronomy recently - I suppose these things come in cycles.
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Old Jun 28, 2004, 12:17pm   #22
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Funnily enough a number of people have said they are interested in astronomy recently - I suppose these things come in cycles.
Glenn
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