Brexit and the Consequences

This is a discussion on Brexit and the Consequences within the The Foyer forums, part of the Off the Grid category; Originally Posted by timsk Yeah, but looking on the bright side, if it means we can buy funny shaped bananas ...

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Old Jul 26, 2016, 12:17pm   #49
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Originally Posted by timsk View Post
Yeah, but looking on the bright side, if it means we can buy funny shaped bananas and cucumbers that don't comply with EU regulation length and girth - it'll be worth it.
The strange thing about that, Tim, is that I was in the fruit shop, in Barcelona, the other day and the Fyffes bananas were straighter, bigger and cheaper than all the others in the shop. Are you sure that this is not an old wives' tale?.
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Old Jul 26, 2016, 12:54pm   #50
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The strange thing about that, Tim, is that I was in the fruit shop, in Barcelona, the other day and the Fyffes bananas were straighter, bigger and cheaper than all the others in the shop. Are you sure that this is not an old wives' tale?.
Yeah, it probably is Split'. That said, the underlying point about not having to do what some unelected bureaucrat in Brussels dictates - still stands.

The Bloomberg article makes for alarming reading - if one chooses to believe it. My view is that it falls firmly into the third category of Disraeli's assessment about lies: "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." I no more accept it's conclusions than I would if someone were to make out that we'll all be better off by the same amount as a result of Brexit. Finances fluctuate, but principles don't change quite so readily and, IMO, are worth hanging on to. On that basis, I believe it's better to be free at the risk of being poorer, potentially at least, than it is to be forever imprisoned in the gilded EU cage.
Tim.
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Old Jul 26, 2016, 1:46pm   #51
 
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Originally Posted by timsk View Post
Yeah, it probably is Split'. That said, the underlying point about not having to do what some unelected bureaucrat in Brussels dictates - still stands.

The Bloomberg article makes for alarming reading - if one chooses to believe it. My view is that it falls firmly into the third category of Disraeli's assessment about lies: "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." I no more accept it's conclusions than I would if someone were to make out that we'll all be better off by the same amount as a result of Brexit. Finances fluctuate, but principles don't change quite so readily and, IMO, are worth hanging on to. On that basis, I believe it's better to be free at the risk of being poorer, potentially at least, than it is to be forever imprisoned in the gilded EU cage.
Tim.
Damn lies indeed.

EU is a voluntary organisation. UK can leave if it wants to.

Becoming a member is more difficult than leaving!

A Member of the European Parliament (MEP) is a person who has been elected to serve as a popular representative in the European Parliament.[1]

When the European Parliament was first established, MEPs were directly appointed by the governments of member states from among those already sitting in their own national parliaments. Since 1979, however, MEPs have been elected by direct universal suffrage. Each member state establishes its own method for electing MEPs and in some states this has changed over time but the system chosen must be a form of proportional representation. In some member states the MEPs are elected to represent a single national constituency; in others they are elected from sub-national regions.



Each Commissioner is first nominated by their member state in consultation with the Commission President, although the President holds little practical power to force a change in candidate. The more capable the candidate is, the more likely the Commission President will assign them a powerful portfolio, the distribution of which is entirely at his discretion. The President's team is then subject to hearings at the European Parliament which will question them and then vote on their suitability as a whole. If members of the team are found to be inappropriate, the President must then reshuffle the team or request a new candidate from the member state or risk the whole Commission being voted down. As Parliament cannot vote against individual Commissioners there is usually a compromise whereby the worst candidates are removed but minor objections are put aside so the Commission can take office. Once the team is approved by parliament, it is formally put into office by the European Council (TEU Article 17:7).

In the last 40 years - just to repeat - 94% of all decisions have been voted for and agreed by UK.

This is likely to be one of the biggest chunk of works that will need to be re-incorporated back into English parliament.
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Old Jul 26, 2016, 1:53pm   #52
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Originally Posted by timsk View Post
Yeah, it probably is Split'. That said, the underlying point about not having to do what some unelected bureaucrat in Brussels dictates - still stands.

The Bloomberg article makes for alarming reading - if one chooses to believe it. My view is that it falls firmly into the third category of Disraeli's assessment about lies: "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." I no more accept it's conclusions than I would if someone were to make out that we'll all be better off by the same amount as a result of Brexit. Finances fluctuate, but principles don't change quite so readily and, IMO, are worth hanging on to. On that basis, I believe it's better to be free at the risk of being poorer, potentially at least, than it is to be forever imprisoned in the gilded EU cage.
Tim.
From your side of the fence, it is, probably, true. Home is where you hang your hat, though, and we all have different ideas. I don't think that I live in a gilded cage. Perhaps, like the monkey, I look through the bars and think the ones looking in are the ones in the cage!
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Old Jul 26, 2016, 2:11pm   #53
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I don't understand you Remainians

What part of "the EU will fall apart" do you not understand ?
Not like it's a secret or anything. The whole world knows it's a big bag of sh*$e
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Old Jul 26, 2016, 2:13pm   #54
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Originally Posted by Atilla View Post
Damn lies indeed.

EU is a voluntary organisation. UK can leave if it wants to.

Becoming a member is more difficult than leaving!

A Member of the European Parliament (MEP) is a person who has been elected to serve as a popular representative in the European Parliament.[1]

When the European Parliament was first established, MEPs were directly appointed by the governments of member states from among those already sitting in their own national parliaments. Since 1979, however, MEPs have been elected by direct universal suffrage. Each member state establishes its own method for electing MEPs and in some states this has changed over time but the system chosen must be a form of proportional representation. In some member states the MEPs are elected to represent a single national constituency; in others they are elected from sub-national regions.



Each Commissioner is first nominated by their member state in consultation with the Commission President, although the President holds little practical power to force a change in candidate. The more capable the candidate is, the more likely the Commission President will assign them a powerful portfolio, the distribution of which is entirely at his discretion. The President's team is then subject to hearings at the European Parliament which will question them and then vote on their suitability as a whole. If members of the team are found to be inappropriate, the President must then reshuffle the team or request a new candidate from the member state or risk the whole Commission being voted down. As Parliament cannot vote against individual Commissioners there is usually a compromise whereby the worst candidates are removed but minor objections are put aside so the Commission can take office. Once the team is approved by parliament, it is formally put into office by the European Council (TEU Article 17:7).

In the last 40 years - just to repeat - 94% of all decisions have been voted for and agreed by UK.

This is likely to be one of the biggest chunk of works that will need to be re-incorporated back into English parliament.
Phew, well that's a relief.
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Old Jul 26, 2016, 2:19pm   #55
 
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I don't understand you Remainians

What part of "the EU will fall apart" do you not understand ?
Not like it's a secret or anything. The whole world knows it's a big bag of sh*$e
Oh yeah sorry Sparky, forgot you knew how things will turn out before everyone else.

Thanks for the heads up


Great plan by the way. Can't wait to see what other surprises you have for us.
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Old Jul 26, 2016, 2:29pm   #56
 
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Don't know about the EU falling apart, but the second biggest brick in the wall is on its way out. I doubt it will result in the dam breaking but it's certainly the biggest existential threat to the EU.
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