The Basics of the Long Ratio Backspread

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Jay Kaeppel

07 Oct, 2016

in Options

One of the primary benefits of trading options is the ability afforded to a trader to craft a position with specific reward/risk characteristics that are not available to the trader who deals only in the underlying stock or futures contract.

What this means is that the buyer of 100 shares of stock will make or lose $100 every time the stock rises or falls $1 in price. An options trader, however, is not limited to this straightforward equation; he or she can enter a position that will make money if the underlying security goes up a lot, goes up a little, stays in a particular range, goes down a little, and so on and so forth. The key to success is to understand the actual reward-to-risk characteristics for a given strategy and apply the appropriate strategy at the appropriate time.

One strategy that offers a unique reward-to-risk profile is known as the "long ratio backspread." This strategy is quite different from many other option trading strategies. Most traders new to options focus on writing covered calls - which limits profit potential and offsets only a small portion of downside risk - or buying calls and puts - which offer unlimited profit potential but which also run the risk of a complete loss of the premium paid if the underlying security fails to move in the anticipated direction.

A long ratio backspread allows a bullish trader to enjoy unlimited upside profit potential as well as the opportunity to make a profit if the underlying security declines in price. Likewise, a trader who is bearish can enjoy unlimited profit potential if the security declines in price, as well as the opportunity to make a small profit if the underlying security rises in price. As with any strategy, there is no free lunch. Whether using call or put options, this strategy can lose money if the underlying security remains in a trading range until option expiration.

Definition of a Long Ratio Backspread
A long ratio backspread (for the sake of simplicity, heretofore referred to simply as a "backspread") can use either call or put options, depending on whether you primarily expect the underlying security to rise or fall in price.

 To enter a backspread using call options a trader would:

  • Sell a call option with a lower strike price and;
  • Simultaneously buy a greater number of call options with a higher strike price.

Most typically this is done in a ratio of 1:02 or 2:3. In other words, a trader who is bullish on a particular stock might sell one call option with a strike price of 20 and buy two call options with a strike price of 25. This is known as a call ratio backspread. On the other end of the spectrum, a trader who is bearish on a given stock might sell two put options with a strike price of 55 and buy three put options with a strike price of 50. This is known as a put ratio backspread. Together, they are both known as long ratio backspreads because the long component of each is larger than the short components.

Example
To better illustrate this concept, let's look at an example. In Figure 1, you see a bar chart for the stock of Celgene (Nasdaq:CELG). As you can see in the bar chart, CELG had recently formed a double top and the 10-day moving average had dropped below the 30-day moving average. This combination of factors might prompt some traders to look for a move to the downside.

 Placeholder

Figure 1: Celgene Stock "rolling over" from a double top: Source: - ProfitSource

Reward versus Risk
One possibility for a risk-averse trader looking to play the downside with CELG would be to enter into a put backspread by selling one put with a strike price of 80 at a price of $12.40 a contract, and to simultaneously buy two put options with a strike price of 70 at a price of $6 a contract. The options in this example have 142 days left until they expire. In this example, the trader sells one 80 strike price put option worth $1,240 and buys two 70 strike price put options worth a total of $1,200 (two contract x $6 a contract x 100 shares) and thus takes in a credit of $40 when entering the trade. Figure 2 displays the resultant risk curves for this trade.

 Placeholder

Risk curves for CELG put ratio backspread option position
Source:- Optionetics Platinum

As you can see in Figure 2, if CELG declines in price, this trade enjoys unlimited profit potential. On the flip side, if the stock rises, a trader could hold this position and ultimately keep the initial credit of $40 if the stock was above $80 a share at the time of option expiration. The major risk associated with this trade would only be realized if the trade was held until expiration and the stock closed at exactly $70 a share.

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